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Author Archive | Nathan Combs

You Asked, We Tested: Will Citrus Acid Damage a Juicer? [Video]

A customer recently asked if the acid from continually juicing citrus fruits would cause damage to the juicer itself. We put the juicer cone up to the test in this video!

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Swingin’ Jazz” by Nicolai Heidlas is licensed under CC BY 3.0

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How to Clean a Blender with Hamilton Beach [Video]

Cleaning a blender container can be a huge hassle – especially if you’re in the middle of a rush! See how the Hamilton Beach Blender Container Rinser can take the time, stress, and danger (those blades are sharp!) out of cleaning your blender!

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Swingin’ Jazz” by Nicolai Heidlas is licensed under CC BY 3.0

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How to Boil Out a Deep Fryer [Video]

“Boiling out” a deep fryer can seem like a daunting task, but it’s critical to maintaining a clean and efficient fryer – and really isn’t even that difficult! Watch our video tutorial to learn how:

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Title photo by Takeaway is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

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How to Clean and Filter Fry Oil [Video]

Keeping the basin of your deep fryer clean and your oil filtered is one of the easiest ways to increase the life of the oil and performance of the fryer. See how in this easy video lesson!

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Transcript:

Hi, I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply. Today, we’re  here in our test kitchen, and I’m going to show you how to extend the life of your oil through proper filtering. Before you begin to filter your oil, here’s some basic equipment that you’re going to need, safety equipment obviously: Some high-temp heat-resistant gloves, a high-temp heat-resistant apron, as well as a face shield for any kind of splatter, a drain poker, a dial thermometer, an extension pipe for your drain, oil test strips, a high-heat temperature scrub brush and a crumb scoop. As well over here, we have a cone filter, cone filter paper, a nice big 32-quart stockpot, and a metal measuring cup, so that way we can move oil back and forth to the basin and the stockpot to scrub out any other crumbs that need be.

First, we can see that this oil needs to be treated, orange, brown and it smells. First, I want to take the temperature. We’re looking for a pretty hot temperature. That way, it helps us scrub out any residual grease and crumbs that we need to. However, we’re not looking at our operating temperature of 350. That is also quite dangerous. Somewhere in that 300-250 range, that’s a good area to start working with it. We see there with 300, so that’s a good temperature. We’re going to get the basket screen out of there. Again, don’t put your hands in there. That’s hot oil. I’m using my drain poker to grab that. Then once we’ve got it out, we can just set it to the side.

Here, I’ve got our draining process set up. This tube right here is where the oil is going to be draining from in that particular basin. Then it’s going to go right through our cone paper filter, into our 32-quart basin. This red handle is our drain valve. We’re going to open that, and slowly start draining the oil. Be sure that you don’t just open the valve completely right away because that’s where the hazard comes in with any kind of splash back with this very hot oil. Start it off nice and slow. Then as it gets going, you can start opening up a little bit more. With your drain valve still open, you want to get some of the oil you’ve already drained, and dump it back into the basin, because as you can see, there’s still a lot of crumbs and residual grit that needs to be washed out.

Again, this is why you have your nice trusty high-heat apron because there can be some splash-back. Some pieces get clogged up. That’s why we’ve got our drain poker. As you start scrubbing the inside, you’ll find some spots that are a little bit tough. Go ahead, and just use a little bit of that hot oil to help give it some of that grease that you’ll need.

 

 

Title photo by Mokeneco is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

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How to Restore Cast Iron Cookware [Video]

Whether you find it at a neighbor’s garage sale or in your grandma’s attic, cast iron cookware is everywhere! It can rust and pit, but with a little care (and sometimes a lot of elbow grease) a good cast iron pan cast last for generations. In this video lesson, we take a pan recovered at a garage sale and see how easy it is to restore!

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Title photo courtesy of David Reber and licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

 

Transcript:

Hi, i’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply and we’re here in our test kitchen. In today’s episode I’m going to show you how to turn your garage sale treasure finds into something restored and beautiful.

Here we got some nice cast iron rusted-away pans we found at a garage sale. What I’m going to do is show you how to restore these back to some nice beautiful cast iron. Essentially what you really need to do is you need to scrub away all the rusted iron. That way we can start from scratch of reseasoning this pan.

Now we’re actually going to season our cast iron. You could use lard, you could use oil, some sort of fat. We need to cover every piece of surface area of your cast iron with the fat because that’s what’s going to bake in to season our cast iron pan. Use the handles. You can get bits of the outside again. Now that I got a nice coat of fat on that I’m going to turn my burner. Obviously that’s high; we’ll cut it back about half way, about medium high. We’re just going to let that bake in, round one.

Once you got that first layer of shortening or fat seasoned in there, kind of cooked out, give it a wipe, get all that residual stuff out of the there. Let it cool down properly. Then what you’re going to want to do is do that same process one more time. Just because you’ve refurbished the entire surface you’re going to want to put a nice good layer of seasoning in there to protect your food.

That’s how you properly restore your cast iron. I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply from our test kitchen. Please comment below, and please subscribe, and call our sales floor directly if you’ve got any further questions. Until next time.

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Tested: Victorinox Knives [Video]

Victorinox is a brand known for quality and durability – but we wanted to put their reputation to the test and see how well their knives really do hold up.

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Transcript:

Hi, I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply. In today’s video I’m going to show you the durability and longevity of Victorinox knives. Here we have a brand new 8″ chef knife. I’m going to pull it right out of the package. We’re going to peel it right out of here, if I knew how. Brand new knife.

What we’re going to do from here, I’ve got two markers. I’m going to mark up the blade. Now that we’ve got our Victorinox knife properly marked up and unique to iself I’m going to hand this off to our testing department and we’ll see what it looks like after its vigorous trials. Here we go.

We’re testing this Victorinox knife three things. The first is dishwasher safeness. Now I don’t recommend putting your knife in the dishwasher, but oftentimes it finds its way there. Just be sure that you keep it in a stable condition so that way the blade doesn’t get knocked around and flaw the integrity of the edge.

As we all know, big reasons why we don’t put blades in the dishwasher is, one, a safety concern. Grabbing that blade is very dangerous. But also the high temperature, the chemicals and sanitation and soap, and the agitation of the machine itself creates a lot of harm for that fine edge

The second thing that we’re testing for is how well your blade holds up to cutting technique and poor use. Always remember, as previously stated, never use a complete straight down motion with your blade as that is very harmful to its edge. Also be sure what kind of cutting board you’re using. Never use a glass cutting board, as those are just for decoration. [So often 02:41] know that wood cutting boards are also harmful to your blades as well, even though we highly recommend wood cutting boards. Be sure that you notice the difference between end grain vs. a side grain. End grain is what you want to use; side grain is much more harmful to your blades.

The third and final thing that we’re testing for is resistance and durability to storage. Knife magnets are great because they keep your knife isolated and away from any other blade or utensil. However, blades often find themselves in a haphazard drawer knocking themselves into other things that are metal, whether it be another knife or utensil or tongs, really decreasing the integrity of your edge.

Now that we’ve done the rigorous testing of the daily ins and outs of a kitchen, let’s see how well this knife blade hones and cuts a tomato. Notice the nice artistic drawing that we put on this blade before the rigorous testing that it went through. As you can see, the red’s still there. It’s just turned a little bit more pink, and it’s definitely got some wear and tear. Let’s see how well this thing hones.

Now that we’ve honed this knife we’ll test it on this nice ripe tomato. I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply and that’s the durability and longevity of  Victorinox knives. If you’ve got any further questions or comments, please comment below or call our sales floor directly. Please subscribe. Here’s to a better mise energy place.

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