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Vintage Range With Broken Thermostat

Question

I have a vintage Detroit Star range from the 30′s or 40′s.  It has a Robertshaw thermostat control for the oven, but I think that the therm or tube is defective. Any ideas on someone that can check it out?  I live in Duluth, MN.

Thanks,  Richard

  • Hey Richard, Is there a possibility you can send me a couple of pictures of the thermostat? Or can you get any numbers off of it? With pictures or numbers I may be able to find it for you. 

Vintage Range With Broken Thermostat

Vintage Range With Broken Thermostat

Vintage Range With Broken Thermostat

Answer

Hey Richard,

The BJWA type thermostat replacement you can use is item #461037. It comes as a kit.

You can get it through etundra.com or you can call them at 800-447-4941 and any of the sales people can help you with it. You would need to call them for pricing and availability.

Let whom ever you talk to know that this is the one that I have recommended.

Hope this helps!

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Fryer Fire Low

QuestionFryer Fire Low

When I put in a small batch of food in the fryer, the fire is perfectly normal; however, when I fry a large batch, the fire becomes so small that the fryer can’t even heat the food.  Do you think the problem is that the thermostat is bad?  How much would you say that part is?  Thank you.

Amie

Answer

Hi Amie,

Ok if you are putting in a lot of frozen product at one time it may be that your fryer does not have enough BTU’s to keep up. Even if it is a large amount of thawed product it may still be that your fryer does not have enough BTU’s to handle the quantity.

When you do large quantities it drops the oil temperature so much so quickly that it can not get back to temperature quickly enough to fry properly.

When you fry just a small amount and it works fine then I would say there is nothing wrong with the thermostat.

Hope this helps.

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Dreamstaurant Contest 2012

Dreamstaurant 2012 has come to a close, but be sure to visit us next year for another round of fun!

 

Dreamstaurant Contest 2012

Tundra Restaurant Supply is excited to announce the Dreamstaurant 2012 winner: Chef Adam Hegsted!

Quick Contest Facts

  • Grand Prize: $20,000 – A restaurant design and product package to help one lucky restaurateur realize their dream restaurant concept
  • Two (2) Home Chef Prizes: two $500 Tundra shopping sprees for home chefs who enter the two best home kitchen ideas
  • Celebrity chef Kelly Liken, a finalist on Bravo’s Top Chef, will sit on Dreamstaurant’s panel of judges and help Tundra select the winner. Chef Kelly, owner and operator of Restaurant Kelly Liken, worked with Tundra’s restaurant designer Jeff Katz on the design of her dream restaurant in Vail, CO.
  • Contest timeline: Entries accepted from October 1, 2012 thru December 31, 2012. Winners will be announced January 21, 2013.
  • Those that qualify for the Grand Prize will receive a follow up survey and then Tundra will select the Grand Prize winner with the help of our professipanel. All other contestants will be eligible for the two second place prizes.
  • In 2013, follow our winner’s progress creating their Dreamstaurant on www.etundra.com.


Why, Who and What

  • Tundra’s mission is to achieve success through the success of our customers. That’s why Tundra has decided to help one lucky food service entrepreneur realize their dream and start their own restaurant.
  • The contest is great for aspiring restaurant owners, existing owners who want to remodel, and anyone who has ever dreamed about creating a dream home kitchen.

Dreamstaurant Sponsors

Premier Sponsors

Dreamstaurant Contest 2012 Dreamstaurant Contest 2012
Dreamstaurant Contest 2012

Prize Package Sponsors

Dreamstaurant Contest 2012 Dreamstaurant Contest 2012
Dreamstaurant Contest 2012 Dreamstaurant Contest 2012
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Replacing Refrigeration Door Gaskets

The rubber door gasket on the inside edge of the doors of all your refrigeration equipment is very important. It prevents cold air from escaping, which means the unit will stay colder longer and use less energy.  Old refrigeration door gaskets wear out and lose their seal. Even worse, older gaskets can pose a food safety risk because they begin to collect grime and food bits and become a breeding ground for bacteria.

Luckily, it’s easy to replace door gaskets!  There are several different styles of gaskets. To ensure you get the proper gasket, gather the following information:

1. Dimension of gasket – Measure from outside corner to outside corner for both height and width.

2. Manufacturer – Get the manufacturer’s name and the model and serial number of the piece of equipment (the serial number may not be needed).  Search for refrigeration door gaskets by manufacturer here.

3. Style –  Check to see if the gasket is magnetic or non-magnetic(compression). Almost all newer refrigeration equipment will have a magnetic gasket. A magnetic gasket will be hard and square at the point where it contacts the inside frame of the unit. Magnetic gaskets will also snap shut when you hold the door less than an inch from the frame because the magnet attracts to the metal.

Replacing Refrigeration Door Gaskets

Magnetic door gaskets are the most common

Compression gaskets usually need a door latch to hold them tight in place to get a good seal. These gaskets are soft and compress easily at the point where they contact the inside frame of the unit.

Replacing Refrigeration Door Gaskets

A compression style door gasket

Door gaskets are also categorized by how they attach to the door.  There are 3 ways a door gasket mounts on a door: snap in (or dart), push in, and screw in.

How To Replace Refrigeration Door Gaskets By Style

Snap in (or dart) door gaskets

Replacing Refrigeration Door Gaskets

Note the arrow shaped “dart” in the middle. This snaps into a slot on the door.

Removal – Remove the old gasket by grabbing a corner and pulling.  The dart section of the gasket, which fits snugly into a slot in the door frame, will pull out.

Installation – To install the new refrigeration door gasket, soak it in hot water for a few minutes. This will make it more flexible.  Begin by snapping in a top corner first. Then, using a mallet or a block of wood and hammer, tap into place the top of the gasket. Continue by installing the sides from top to bottom, and finally the bottom.

Note: Make sure the hinge side of the gasket does not roll under when you close the door.  If it does, push it into position and you may have to tape the door closed to get the gasket to seat itself. You might also try a hair dryer to heat the gasket as this will help it seat. (Make sure you don’t melt the gasket!)

Replacing Refrigeration Door Gaskets

A push in style door gasket

Push in refrigeration door gaskets

Removal – Remove the old gasket by grabbing a corner and pulling!

Installation – Push in gaskets may require vinyl cement. To install the new gasket brush some vinyl cement into the channel and press the gasket into the channel.

Note: Make sure the hinge side of the gasket does not roll under when you close the door.  If it does, push it into position and you may have to tape the door closed to get the gasket to seat itself.  You may also use a hair dryer to heat the gasket as this will help the gasket seat.  (Make sure you don’t melt the gasket!)

Screw in door gaskets

Removal – Simply remove screws.

Installation – Screw in the new gasket using retainer strips.

A screw in style door gasket. Note the strip for screwing in the gasket.
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Repairing Commercial Fryers

When your fryer needs to be repaired you probably want to get it up and running again fast.  Fortunately, commercial fryers are generally easy to repair, and parts are also pretty easy to come by.  There are 4 fryer parts that most commonly cause a fryer to fail:

1. Hi-Limit
2. Thermopile
3. Combination Safety Gas Valve
4. Thermostat

How to Determine What the Problem Is

BE SURE TO TURN OFF THE POWER AND/OR GAS FIRST!

If the pilot light will not stay lit, 1 of 3 things have failed:

  1. Hi-Limit. First, check to see if the hi-limit is the culprit by taking one wire off and connecting it with the other wire.  Do as you always do and light the pilot.  If the pilot remains lit, then the high limit is bad and needs to be replaced.  To replace the hi-limit, you first need to empty the oil from the tank.  This needs to be done because the sensing bulb for the hi-limit enters through the side of the tank.  There is a large nut in the side of the tank and a smaller nut inside the large nut, loosen and pull these off.  Now you can remove the defective high limit.  Reverse the procedure to install the new hi-limit.  Always screw the larger nut into the tank first and then the smaller nut.  Light the pilot and your unit should be working.Repairing Commercial Fryers
  2. Thermopile. If the pilot still will not stay lit, then the thermopile is most likely the culprit.  One end is attached to the pilot and the other is attached to the gas valve.  Remove the thermopile from both places and replace.  Light the pilot, and if it remains lit you are good to go.  Also, remember to reconnect the hi-limit wire.Repairing Commercial Fryers
  3. Combination Safety Gas Valve. If the pilot still will not stay lit, then the only thing left is the combination safety gas valve.  To replace the combo valve, you will need to have a couple of pipe wrenches.  This is the most difficult part to change, due to the limited space.  Remember to install the new gas valve in the same direction and replace all the connections.Repairing Commercial Fryers

If the pilot is lit, but the fryer still does not work, the thermostat may be faulty.  Only 3 things can happen:

  1. Either the burner will not light when turned on even though the pilot is lit.
  2. The oil will not get hot enough.
  3. When the oil reaches temperature it will not shut off.

Thermostat. In either case the thermostat will need to be replaced.  If it is running wild (will not shut off) the oil will overheat causing the hi-limit to trip out and shut everything off.  By resetting the hi-limit and relighting the pilot and it stays lit, then you will know that the thermostat is not good.  To replace the thermostat follow the same instructions for replacing the hi-limit.Repairing Commercial Fryers

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Converting Gas Restaurant Equipment In 5 Simple Steps

Converting any piece of gas equipment from natural gas to propane or from propane to natural gas is fairly simple and can be accomplished in 5 easy steps.

Parts needed to convert the equipment:

  • Burner Orifices
  • Pilot Orifice
  • Regulator
  • Combination Safety Valve conversion kit
  • Nomenclature (tag on unit that has model and serial number on it).

ALWAYS REMEMBER TO TURN OFF ALL GAS TO THE UNIT!!

Converting Gas Restaurant Equipment In 5 Simple Steps

1.  Replacing burner orifices. First, the most important thing you need to know is the brand name, model and serial numbers of your unit.  Next thing you will need to know is what altitude the unit you are converting is at.  This will determine what orifice size you will need.  You will also need to know the number of top burners as well as any other burners such as oven burners and the number of oven pilots (if you are converting a range).  The conversion can be done one of two ways: either by using the manufacturer’s conversion kit or with individual parts.  The conversion kits can be more expensive than using individual parts.

The conversion can take some time because whatever piece of equipment you are converting has to be dismantled and then reassembled.  Begin by removing all the burners and then remove what is needed to be removed in order to access the burner valves.  The burner valves do not need to be removed.  Remove the old orifices and install the new orifices (orifices are screwed to the end of the valve).

2.  Replace pilot orifices. If you are converting an oven, you also need to change the pilot orifice.  The pilot tube is attached to the pilot with a nut.  Unscrew the nut and pull the tube out of the pilot assembly.  When the tube is pulled out, the orifice should fall out; if it does not, tap the pilot assembly.  Replace the pilot orifice and reassemble.  Reassemble the unit the same way you took it apart (you are almost done!)

Converting Gas Restaurant Equipment In 5 Simple Steps

3.  Replace the gas regulator. You must change the gas regulator usually found at the back of the equipment.  Remove the old regulator and install the new regulator, making sure that the gas flow direction is accurate.  The regulator has an arrow on the bottom of it and it must point toward the piece of equipment.

Reconnect the gas hose, turn on the gas and check all connections for leaks.  This can be done with soap bubbles – wipe soapy water onto the connections and look for places where it bubbles up, indicating a leak.  Light all your pilots (it may take a little time to purge out all the air).  Adjust the pilots to the correct flame height by turning the adjustment screw on the pilot valve.  Now turn on one burner at a time (you want a nice blue tip flame).  If there is yellow or orange in the flame you will need to adjust the air shutter on the burner to  correct the flame.   This goes for top burners as well as the oven burners.regulator, making sure that the gas flow direction is accurate.  The regulator has an arrow on the bottom of it and it must point toward the piece of equipment.

Converting Gas Restaurant Equipment In 5 Simple Steps4.  Converting combination safety valves. Some pieces of equipment have combination safety valves, most notably fryers.  There are conversion kits for them (there is no choice on this).  The kit contains a plate and gaskets.  There are instructions with each kit, and it is very simple to change.  Remove the old plate from the top of the safety valve and follow the instructions to install the new plate and gaskets.  The conversion is complete!

You can special order a conversion kit easily by calling 1-888-388-6372.

5.  Replace the unit’s nomenclature. By law, the nomenclature must also be replaced.  This is only available through the manufacturer of the piece of equipment being converted.  Sometimes it takes awhile to get them, so until you get the replacement, you should remove the word “natural” from the tag with a magic marker and write in large letters, “LP”.  When you receive the new tag, simply stick it over the old one.

You have now converted your equipment from natural gas to propane or vice versa.

Congratulations!

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The Leading Source for Restaurant Parts, Equipment & Supplies

The Leading Source for Restaurant Parts, Equipment & Supplies

eTundra.com – Restaurant Supplies, Equipment, & Parts

eTundra.com is the force behind The Back Burner blog.  The employees of eTundra.com write this blog using the food service expertise they have accumulated over many years in the industry.

eTundra.com is a comprehensive resource of products, including restaurant equipment, supplies, and equipment parts.  Our online catalog has over 50,000 items and our website is recognized as one of the best in the business.

Even better, eTundra.com has an incredible team of customer service representatives whose expert knowledge of the industry and the products we sell makes them an indispensable resource to our customers.

But most of all eTundra.com is a great partner for you, no matter what portion of the food service industry you inhabit.  We work hard to make sure our customers succeed because we know that through our customer’s success we will find our own.

So what are you waiting for?  Partner with us today and we’ll show you what having a true partner in the food service industry is really like.

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Identify Commercial Faucet Parts

There are many different brands of faucets on the market.

Some of the most common faucet brands are:

Identify Commercial Faucet Parts

A T&S Faucet

Some faucets are easily identified and sometimes it is more difficult.  The best way to identify the faucet you have is by the manufacturer’s name found on the front of the base.  The base is the part that the stems and spout attach to.  If the brand name has been worn off from age you may find the name on the end of the spout.  If you are still not able to identify the type of faucet, then we move on to identifying portions of the stem faucet.  The shape of the spout would be another factor.

Identify Commercial Faucet Parts

A CHG/Encore Faucet

Most manufacturers have different shaped spouts.  This includes the angle at which they are bent to the curvature of the bends.  Another identifying factor is how it attaches to the body.  They all have a nut that either screws into the body (male threads) or screws over the outside of the body (female thread).  Most have the female threaded nut, so the last identifying possibility is whether there are o-rings on the part that inserts into the body.  Some may have a double or a single o-ring (rubber).  There are others that have a brass sealing ring.

Identify Commercial Faucet Parts

A Krowne Faucet

Sometimes you still may not be able to identify the faucet correctly.  The last means of identification are the stem assemblies.  Of course, they vary by manufacturer, and some may have different stem assemblies depending on whether or not they go into a standard duty or heavy duty faucet.  They may also vary if it is a wall mount or deck mount faucet.

There are three manufacturers (CHG, T&S, and Krowne) that use what is called a barrel type stem assembly.  The barrel inserts into the body of the faucet and the stems screw into the barrel.  They do differ and are not interchangeable. The T&S and Krowne can be confused with one another because of the bonnet assembly, although the handles are very different and the name may be embossed into the stem.  Encore/CHG is fairly easy to identify by the black plastic cap that covers the packing nut that screws into the bonnet nut.

Identifying other stem assemblies may be a little more difficult.  You would need to remove the stem for proper identification.  Look at the bonnet nut to see if it is a female or male thread.  Check to see if it has o-rings on it (single or double), or no o-rings.  Also check the spline on the stem, which is at the top of the stem where the handle attaches.  It can help sometimes.  For example, a Chicago stem has no spline and it is square.  A Perlick stem has no spline.  These are not interchangeable so be sure you are getting the right one.

If all else fails compare your stem to pictures of stems and assemblies online.    If you are unable to match up your stem, it may be a discontinued model or it may be a residential version.  If this is the case you may have to replace the entire faucet.

Check out more food service parts.

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Replacing Refrigeration Door Latches & Hinges

There are many different styles of hinges and latches for refrigeration equipment.Replacing Refrigeration Door Latches & Hinges

Both the hinges and latches have a number on the back.  In addition, they may say “flush” or have the offset size, e.g. 1 1/8, 1 ½, etc.  It is important to have that number on the back to ensure you get the proper replacement.

Let’s talk hinges!

Walk in cooler or freezer hinges are either flush or offset.  The easiest way to determine which style you have is to place your hand on the outside wall of the walk-in and slide it towards the door.  If the door stops your hand from moving across the door then you have an offset door.  If your hand slides across the door it is flush.

Determine the offset measure by measuring from the wall surface to the door surface.  The offset measure combined with the number on the back will ensure you receive the correct hinge.

Also, some walk-in hinges are reversible.  If you receive a hinge and it is the reverse of what you need, you can reverse the new hinge.

Replacing Refrigeration Door Latches & HingesLet’s talk latches!

Walk-in latches, like hinges, are for either offset or flush doors.  Use the same procedure as you would for a hinge to determine if it is an offset or flush latch.  Also make sure you find the number on the back of the latch.

Edgemount latches and hinges are most commonly found on reach-in type refrigerators and freezers.  Edgemount means they mount on the edge of the door.  The hinges and latches can mount on either side of the door.

Some hinges are spring assisted and some are self-closing:

  • Self-closing hinges use a cam system to close the door
  • Some of the edgemount hinges have spring assist kits available.  As with all latches and hinges, there’s a number on the back for identifying the correct replacement

There are two types of edgemount latches: Magnetic type or those that have a strike that the latch locks into.  These latches also have a number on them.

The best way to get the correct hinge or latch is to get that number off the back!

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Replacing Refrigeration Fan Motors & Blades

Refrigerators are the backbone of your kitchen.  They are usually durable and long-lasting, but when they go down, you have to have them fixed right away.  Some tips on replacing the fan motor in your commercial refrigeration unit:Replacing Refrigeration Fan Motors & Blades

There are two types of motors for refrigeration.

1. Condenser fan motor.
2. Evaporator fan motor.

First, we will discuss the condenser fan motor:

The condenser fan motor is mounted on the condensing unit located outside the refrigeration interior.  The size of the refrigerator unit will determine the motor size.  Motors vary in size, voltage and rotation.  All of this information is found on the motor, and is very important to have when ordering.  Rotation is vital to the operation of the unit.  Rotation will either be clockwise (CW) or counter-clockwise (CCW).

The fan blade is also a critical part of the motor.  The blade is similar to the motor in that it is either CW or CCW.   Normally the rotation of a fan blade is stamped into the blade assembly.  When replacing either the motor or the fan blade be sure to use the same rotation type.

Replacing Refrigeration Fan Motors & Blades

Next, we will discuss the evaporator fan motor:

The evaporator is located inside the refrigeration interior, and will always be located on the ceiling or top of the unit.  There are two types of evaporative motors:

1. Open winding type.
2. Closed type.

On the open winding motor the copper wires are exposed and visible to the eye.  The open winding motors are usually reversible.  This is done by removing the bearing housing and pulling out the armature.  The armature is the part that has the fan blade attached to it.  Simply turn it around and put the shaft through the other direction and reassemble.  Now you have gone from CW to CCW motor or a CCW to a CW.  Each manufacturer will vary in what direction their motors rotate.

The closed winding motor has an encasement around it.  The rotation will be stamped on the back of the motor.  Mounting holes will be either on the side or rear of the motor.  If the motor fails, the motor will need to be replaced and cannot be repaired.

Buy general use fan motors or search by manufacturer here.

As with every piece of equipment the most important thing is the model and serial number on the equipment itself.  Generally, the model and serial numbers are found in the interior of an upright cooler/freezer, prep table or under counter cooler/freezer.  If the condensing unit is attached to one side or the other of the unit, the model and serial numbers may be found inside that area.

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