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Archive | Food Service

There are thousands of topics to discuss around food service, these are just a few that our authors have written about.

Buying Guide: Commercial Ice Machine Types

Picking the correct ice type for your establishment is very important when shopping for a commercial ice machine. The shape of the ice has everything to do with its intended purpose.  Whether used in beverages, food presentation or health care services, Tundra Restaurant Supply offers many different types of ice machines in order to satisfy the widest variety of uses.

Full cube: Also known as “full dice cube”, measures 7/8” on all sides and looks very much like a cube. This ice type is the most recognizable by consumers and offers maximum cooling with nearly 100% ice to water ratio. Furthermore, it melts slowly and can be produced quickly which is perfect for high-volume operations.

Ideal uses include:Buying Guide: Commercial Ice Machine Types

  • Mixed drinks
  • Carbonated beverages
  • Bagged ice/ice retailing
  • Ice dispensers
  • Banquet services
  • Ice displays

Full Cube Ice Machines

Half Cube: Also known as “half dice cube”, measures 3/8” x 7/8” x 7/8” and can be used for a wide variety of applications. Like full cube ice, half cube offers maximum cooling with nearly 100% ice to water ratio. The small, easy-to-handle shape is perfect for blended drinks because if breaks down easily and creates a smoother finish.

Ideal uses include:Buying Guide: Commercial Ice Machine Types

  • Blended drinks
  • Mixed drinks
  • Carbonated drinks
  • Ice dispensers
  • Ice displays
  • Banquet services

Half Cube Ice Machines

Nugget Ice: Also known as “pearl ice” or “cubelet ice”, measures 3/8” – ½” in diameter and encompasses a soft, chewable texture. This ice type is very versatile and slow melting. It cools drinks rapidly due to its high liquid displacement resulting in increased profits.

Ideal uses include:Buying Guide: Commercial Ice Machine Types

  • Blended cocktails
  • Smoothies
  • Fountain drinks
  • Salad bars
  • Therapeutic uses/patient care
  • Produce displays

Nugget Ice Machines

Flake Ice: Also known as “Shaved ice” is small, soft pieces of ice with a 73% ice to water ratio. Flake ice maintains food hydration, which extends the shelf life and appearance of seafood, produce, meat displays and helps increase sales. Flake ice is also great for use in bakeries, catering and health care applications.

Ideal used include:Buying Guide: Commercial Ice Machine Types

  • Produce, seafood and meat displays
  • Blended cocktails
  • Therapeutic uses/patient care
  • Salad bars

Flake Ice Machines

Hopefully this ice machine buying guide exposes all of the options you have when it comes to choosing the right commercial ice machine for your needs. If you have any questions, do not hesitate to ask them in a comment below!

 

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10 Energy Saving & Compliance Tips For Your Restaurant

Here are suggestions for energy savings and compliance with the Colorado Retail Food Establishment Rules and Regulations:

1. Ensure efficient door closers for coolers. I frequently observe cooks open doors on line coolers and the doors are left standing open until someone thinks to kick them closed. What a waste of cold air and increased compressor run time! It equals $$ lost, plus foods can warm up above 41 F.

10 Energy Saving & Compliance Tips For Your Restaurant2. Obtain and use the Comark PDT-300 thermometer. The regulations require a thin probe thermometer if you serve “thin foods” such as patties. I use it, it is NSF approved, and in my opinion, it is the best one for the money.

3. Use overhead glass hangers for 3-compartment sinks if drain board space is lacking. The regulations specifically allow for “alternative methods” for drying in lieu of drain boards.

4. Use metal pans, instead of plastic, for prep table coolers. Metal is superior in heat conduction and will REALLY help your foods stay at 41 F or below, which is required.10 Energy Saving & Compliance Tips For Your Restaurant

5. Ensure tight fitting pivot lids on prep table coolers. If yours have gaps or are loose fitting, this allows warm air in, energy $$ are lost, and foods can warm up above 41 F.

6. Be aware that due to the increased emphasis on hand washing and the prohibition of bare hand contact with ready-to-eat food, it is more and more common for additional hand sinks to be required, especially in existing facilities. The smaller modular hand sinks with integrated splash guards are a great and relatively inexpensive solution.

10 Energy Saving & Compliance Tips For Your Restaurant

7. Use nail brushes…although they are not required, clean fingernails are required.  I know of no other way to clean under nails than with a brush.

8. Purchase color codedutensils.  They are a great way, if used properly, to separate raw meats from ready-to-eat foods, preventing cross contamination. They are a convenient, easy for non-English speaking employees to comprehend, and easy for managers to verify their proper use by employees.

9. Install additional shelving in your walk-in cooler.  Step back and look at your shelves and the food containers on them.  Do you have unused vertical space?  Get the most out of your walk-in!

10. Use walk-in cooler curtains.  They help maintain the temperature of foods in the walk-in and result in $$ savings in energy costs.

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Instagram: A Social Media Must For Food Service

Instagram: A Social Media Must For Food ServiceIsn’t it ironic, after years of striving for flawless, lifelike images of the highest achievable resolution, people are still drawn back to vintage photographs with light-leaked softness? There is just something about the tones and hues of the snapshots that add character and personality to even the most ordinary day-to-day events in life.

That is the perception Instagram hit the ground running with and they were dead on. Since launching in October 2010 Instagram has captured 80 million+ registered users, 4 billion+ uploaded photos, 5 million+ photos per day and they are still growing beyond belief. And it’s obvious that among those millions are chefs, restaurants and foodies who are using the app to connect with their fans as another social media avenue.

Instagram is mainly used as a personal mood board but there is, however, a fraction of chefs and restaurateurs out there using the app for much more. The cleaver tool becomes an outlet to show off food porn including new menu items, fancy cocktails, tasteful desserts, customer and employee candids and artistic close ups.  Below are a few great example of how Instagram is being used in the Food Service industry to inspire and reel in fans.

Food trucks can also greatly benefit from Instagram. Take daily portraits of your ever changing and creative menu – the tasty food items themselves, not the chalkboard menu – as well as snapshots of private events. You can also mix in some silly photos of staff, hanging out at home with a decadent cocktail in hand or researching new fancy flavors. It’s truly the personalization that lures fans in. They become more invested in your brand when you let them into your personal life than if you were just a random food truck they only came in contact with once a week.

A neat feature Instagram encompasses aside from 18 filters is the sharing option. You can share your photos taken through Instagram on Facebook, Twitter, Tumbler, Flickr and foursquare. Sharing your photos is a great and easy way to let existing social media fans know you are present on Instagram. In addition, when posting a picture, don’t forget to geotag, hash tag and call out other users in your photo’s description (ex #Tequila tasting with @mgpatter0106 at Zolo Grill). Again, easy ways of letting fans find you.

Lastly, customers, friends and family have the option to engage with you through the app. Similar to Facebook, users can comment and “like” your photos. In fact, if they really dig your picture, they can tweet it to their followers – BONUS!

In the end, the technology is there for your taking. You can use it for your personal photo album or a soft-filtered glimpse of your restaurant and workings of your business. Just remember that is it a fun, free way to connect with your fans and it’s not going away anytime soon!

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Floor Strainers: What Do You Need Them For?

Benjamin Franklin once said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” With that in mind, are you doing everything you can to protect your floor drains? With items like vegetable cuttings, miscellaneous trash bits and general dirt finding its way into your floor drains, it’s just a matter of time before disease, foul odors, slip hazards and health code violations fall into your hands. At worst, you may have to close down your kitchen for a day to remove the clog. At best, the kitchen will have to work around a plumber for a few hours. This is an inconvenience and costly expense you can easily prevent!Floor Strainers: What Do You Need Them For?

A floor drain strainer, as with strainers used in sinks, is a device that insets into the floor drain and collects all debris entering the drain, preventing it from creating a clog. Floor drain strainers come in different sizes and styles and are usually plastic or metal. The most common types either sit in the floor drain or are a cover attached to the top of the drain. Regardless of which style best serves you, the cost of the strainer will be far less than the cost of one plumber service call.

When it comes to selecting a floor drain strainer, follow these three steps:

  1. Identify the style of your drain
  2. Determine the types of debris that could potentially clog your drain
  3. Select a strainer that will provide the greatest protection

Though floor drain strainers are not required in every state they are highly recommended. Preventative plumbing will create fewer plumbing expenses, eliminate wet and slippery floors, risk of fines and increase employee productivity. The benefits far outweigh the expenses.

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BPA: Helping You Make the Right Choice for your Restaurant

BPA: Helping You Make the Right Choice for your RestaurantBisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical used as a building block in certain plastics and resins since the 1960’s. Furthermore, BPA is found in many food storage containers made of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Some research has shown that BPA can seep into food or beverages from containers made with BPA or into your body when you handle BPA products causing health effects on the brain, behavior and prostate gland of fetuses, infants and children. Though this topic remains controversial and many plastics companies say there isn’t risk associated with BPA, consumers are starting to pay close attention to the plastics they handle.

The Food and Drug Administration now shares this level of concern and is taking steps to reduce human exposure to BPA in the food supply industry by finding alternatives to BPA in food containers.

Here is what the FDA is telling consumers to do:

  • Plastic containers have recycle codes on the bottom. Some, but not all, plastics that are marked with recycle codes 3 or 7 may be made with BPA.
  • Do not put very hot or boiling liquid that you intend to consume in plastic containers made with BPA. BPA levels rise in food when containers/products made with the chemical are heated and come in contact with the food.
  • Discard all bottles with scratches, as these may harbor bacteria and, if BPA-containing, lead to greater release of BPA.

Because the BPA issue has raised concern amongst consumers it is very important for restaurants to show their awareness. The best way to do this is obvious, start using BPA free plastics. There are several manufacturers who offer this option.

Cambro Manufacturing Company offers an abundance of BPA Free products. BPA is not found in Cambro’s polypropylene or polyethylene storage containers, ABS products, or in most Cambro tumblers which are made from the SAN resin.

Rubbermaid Commercial Products is also committed to helping you make the right choice in your establishment. RCP created the revolutionary product line in collaboration with Eastman Chemical Company using its Tritan™ copolyester, a material free of BPA that offers the highest quality, durability and clarity in the industry. The collection includes ingredient management, food pans, food boxes, and square food storage containers.

Check out the cool video RCP made to show off how their BPA free products hold up in a commercial kitchen.

FOH just started offering an awesome BPA free barware collection called Drinkwise. The drinkware is safe for 3,000+ washings, stronger and longer lasting than SAN and polycarbonate, has glass like clarity, is heat resistant to 248°F, chemical resistant, crack proof and impact and shatter resistant. Not only is this stuff tough, it’s stylish too!

If you do decide to go BPA free, make sure you market it like crazy. As with anything “green”, customers look for your impacting initiatives and appreciate your awareness. To special order BPA free products just contact Tundra Restaurant Supply. They can get you anything you need!

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5 Simple Recommendations to Earn Bigger Tips

5 Simple Recommendations to Earn Bigger TipsWith most Americans eating out 4-5 times a week, it is no wonder the food service industry continues to grow even in a slow economy. A server’s position is a main component of a successful restaurant operation. A server’s job responsibilities include greeting guests with friendliness, knowing the menu inside and out, provide high quality service, maintaining a professional appearance, communicating with staff to ensure guest satisfaction, and a variety of additional side tasks. Research has shown that server’s who earn better than average tips are less likely to be turned over as quickly as industry standards and maintains a better working relationships with co-workers and restaurant guests.

Here are five simple recommendations that will earn you larger tips today.

  1. Lean or squat down to introduce you by name. This shows you are personable and ready to listen.
  2. Always smile when speaking to guests. Friendliness is always noticed, people go out to eat to enjoy themselves and have a good time. The last thing they want to encounter is a grumpy server.
  3. Entertain customers with a fun restaurant fact, joke or puzzle. Reiterating the friendliness aspect of a server’s job description, sharing a quick fun fact shows you’re here to give your guests a pleasant experience.
  4. Repeat a customer’s order back to them. This one is simple, but it shows you are listening and you care about giving your guests exactly what they want.
  5. Write ‘thank you’ on the check. One extra reminder that shows your guests you enjoyed serving them.

Severing can be a tough job, the hours can be long and the appreciation sometimes low. However happiness is contagious and chances are if you smile and treat people well they will likely treat you well. Listening to guests and helping them experience an enjoyable dining experience will likely lead to increased tips.

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Molecular Gastronomy: Making science, food and eating fun!

Molecular Gastronomy: Making science, food and eating fun!

Have you heard of molecular gastronomy before? No? You’re not alone, molecular gastronomy is a modern style of cooking, and practiced by scientists and chefs who take advantage of many technical innovations from scientific disciplines. Put more simply, think of mixing up drinks like Nitrogen Cooled Lemon Drop Martinis. Or whipping up Crispy Chicken Tacos with Chili Relleno Space Foam.

Dreamstaurant celebrity chef and judge, Ian Kleinman is a pioneering molecular gastronomist and owner of The Inventing Room, a unique catering and food entertainment company based in Denver, CO. His molecular gastronomy recipes include Super Cold & Creamy Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream, Floating Truffles, and Root Beer Floats with Liquid Nitrogen Whipped Ice Cream. Chef Kleinman believes food should be fun and every dining experience should have amazing food, Molecular Gastronomy: Making science, food and eating fun!drinks and service but also contain an entertainment quality that makes you think about your food and how it’s made instead of mindlessly eating it.

Borrowing tools from the science lab and ingredients from the kitchen, molecular gastronomists concoct surprise after surprise for their diners. You may wonder ‘Can I really eat this?’ or ‘Is it safe?’ The truth is the chemicals used in molecular gastronomy are all of biological origin. Even though they have been purified and some of them processed, the raw material origin is usually marine, plant, animal or microbial. These additives are also used in very, very small amounts and have been approved by EU standards. Plus the science lab equipment used just helps modern gastronomy chefs to do simple things like maintaining the temperature of the cooking water constant (water bath), cooling food at extremely low temperatures fast (liquid nitrogen) or extract flavor from food (evaporator).

Molecular Gastronomy: Making science, food and eating fun!If you’re passionate about cooking, have a creative mind but at the same time have a scientific background, molecular gastronomy is something worth experiencing.

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Your Butcher Block & You: Tips For Maintaining a Healthy Relationship

Your Butcher Block & You: Tips For Maintaining a Healthy RelationshipElegant yet practical, the butcher block is an attractive kitchen addition that many culinary adventurers choose to install in their home or business. The appeal of a professional butcher block, for both its beauty and everyday convenience, often leads budding chefs and casual cooks alike to spend hundreds of dollars, if not thousands, on the right style or quality guarantee. Unfortunately, professional butcher blocks require a professional dedication to cleanliness and care to stay their best, and if that new butcher block isn’t maintained and cared for properly it quickly becomes an expensive, unattractive chopping block.

Fortunately, forming a healthy, long-lasting relationship with your butcher block is relatively easy. By following a few simple guidelines while you’re working and during cleanup you can keep your block strong, beautiful, and working for you for years to come.

Before installation:

Butcher blocks are made from various woods, and the funny thing about wood is it has a tendency to play by its own rules as time progresses. Over the years, and as the seasons pass, your butcher block will respond to the changes in humidity and continually expand and contract. During those hot, humid months of summer many blocks will expand by as much as 1/8 of an inch, and when the heat retreats and the colder months of winter sweep in your block contracts and shrinks. Accounting for expansion when installing a brand new butcher block is a must, and failing to do so can cause your block to bow and crack when it expands.    

While you work:

  • First and foremost, never use razor-edged cutting tools on your block if you want to preserve its integrity for longer than a few months. Razor-Your Butcher Block & You: Tips For Maintaining a Healthy Relationshipedged tools are simply too sharp to use without chipping away at the wood’s surface. Punishing your butcher block by repeatedly chipping away at the surface creates soft spots and unwanted cracking that eventually affects performance. Make sure the edges of your utensils are dulled to keep your block in the best shape possible after each use.
  • Just like using razor-edged tools, cutting in the same spot on your butcher block leads to early aging and premature deterioration. Evenly distributing your cuts, chops, and preparation whatnots around the butcher block prevents any one area from wearing too quickly and developing soft spots. Periodically flip your block over and alternate between cutting surfaces to extend the block’s life and keep both sides wearing evenly.
  • When it comes to fish or fowl:  Never cut fish or fowl on your butcher block unless the block has been thoroughly cleaned. The safety stipulations surrounding seafood and popular fowl require a sanitary prep environment, and a poorly maintained butcher block is a quick way to customer complaints, sickness, and possible legal actions.

Cleaning up afterward:

  • Moisture is the enemy when it comes to keeping your butcher block solid and strong, and the worst thing you can do after you’re done on the block is let moisture stand for a long time. Sooner than you’d think that standing moisture (be it water, juices, brine, or blood) soaks into the surface of your butcher block and softens the wood, causing it to expand and for the glued joints to break down. As soon as possible remove any lingering moisture from the block’s surface.
  • A tried and true method of removing up to 75% of the moisture from a butcher block’s surface is scraping it with a steel scraper or spatula. Scraping many times a day helps keep everything clean, dry, and sanitary by removing the risk of harmful bacteria build up. To remove remaining moisture be sure to wipe the surface down with a soft, absorbent cloth.
  • Once you’ve scraped and wiped down your block it’s smart to give it a good wash to ensure you’ve removed all contaminants and food remnants, but NEVER PUT YOUR BUTCHER BLOCK IN THE DISHWASHER. Wash your block by hand, using regular dish soap and hot water, and avoid submerging it in water. The key to a good, thorough clean is keeping your block as dry as possible while washing (which sounds counter-intuitive since you’re washing the thing), but once again the longer your butcher block is exposed to water the more it will absorb that moisture and cause damage. If you don’t rush, and clean thoroughly and consistently, you’ll have an odorless, clean cutting surface for next time.

Your Butcher Block & You: Tips For Maintaining a Healthy Relationship*NOTE: Never use a steel brush to scrape. It’s too rough and will damage your butcher block.

Avoiding a rocky relationship with your brand new butcher block is a must if you expect the block to stick around for longer than a month or two. You’ve got to show it some love, treat it right, and care for it appropriately if you want the time you and your butcher block share to be long-lived and fruitful. Following a few simple guidelines is all it takes!

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The Rise of Healthy Kids Meal Options

The Rise of Healthy Kids Meal OptionsRestaurants focus on developing healthy kid meal options that are more appealing to families.

Pizza, hot dogs, chicken fingers and grilled cheeses are just a few kid-friendly foods available when eating out. Recently, these are the same foods that have come under scrutiny from parents and nutritional experts who worry about what kids are eating.

Chefs and restaurateurs have both business reasons and true concerns for what kids are eating, this is one of the reasons children’s nutrition was projected to be a major trend at foods service establishments during 2012.

The National Restaurant Association’s annual “What’s Hot” survey of professional chefs determined that healthful meals for young people would be the No. 4 trend in the industry this year.

The National Kids LiveWell Program works in collaboration with Healthy Dining to help parents and children select healthful menu options when dining out. The restaurants that participate in the voluntary program commit to offering healthful meal items for children, with a particular focus on increasing consumption of fruit and vegetables, lean protein, whole grains and low-fat dairy, and limiting unhealthy fats, sugars and sodium.

The big question that remains is: Are kids eating these healthier meals? From early research the answer is, yes. Teaching kids to eat healthy foods from a young age will help them develop healthy eating patterns for life, offering kid-friendly meals with a variety of vegetables, using proteins that are naturally lower in calories and rich in vitamins and minerals will ensure kids choose healthy foods over processed, fatty foods.

I’m a restaurant owner, how do I join the Kids LiveWell Program?

The Rise of Healthy Kids Meal Options

According to Restaurant.org: “Restaurants that join Kids LiveWell agree to offer and promote a selection of items that meet qualifying nutrition criteria based on leading health organizations’ scientific recommendations, including the 2010 USDA Dietary Guidelines.” Kids LiveWell Nutrition Criteria for a full meal:

  • 600 calories or less
  • ≤ 35% of calories from total fat
  • ≤ 10% of calories from saturated fat
  • < 0.5 grams trans fat (artificial trans fat only)
  • ≤ 35% of calories from total sugars (added and naturally occurring)
  • ≤ 770 mg of sodium
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Serving: Common Wrong-Ways of Doing Common Things

Sometimes in life, the experience we gain, the repetitions we perform, can create a false feeling of perfection. The more times we perform a task without complication, the more we tend to believe that we are performing it perfectly.  This isn’t always the case.

A false feeling of perfection is something I have witnessed many times in the restaurant industry.  It seems that once servers get comfortable with their environment, they stop considering their actions.  As professional servers and managers, we must always strive to be better, to learn more, to hone our craft and to question our processes. When working with the same group of people, who have the same mentality and knowledge as ourselves, there is no one amongst us to correct us, to improve us or to guide us; we must rely on ourselves.

Below is a list of common wrong-ways of doing common things.  Do you do any of these?  What could you change tonight that could make you even better at your job?Serving: Common Wrong Ways of Doing Common Things

1.  Handle stem-ware from the stem not the globe.  Holding glasses from the base is what your customer can do, not you.  Keep the glass clean and free of smudges for as long as it is in your possession.

2.  When clearing glasses from a table DO NOT GRAB FROM THE RIM.  Palm the glasses in your hand or use a serving tray.  When you grab glasses from the top you are touching lots of people’s lips and spit…yuck.

3.  When you go to your table, return to the same spot every time.  People are creatures of habit.  Create a fast habit for your table and train them to notice you by being consistent.

4.  Seams down, seams in on all things linen. It’s a small thing but it creates a polished look that lets customers know that attention to detail is important to you.  That can create trust in the server/customer relationship.

5.  Do not carry your check presenter in your butt.  Some people do this and those people shouldn’t.

6.  Do not carry your serviette over your shoulder.  Your serviette should never be near your hair. Carry the serviette in your hand and pocket it when not in use.

7.  Do not point in the dining room.  Pointing is rude, you were taught that when you were little.  That rule applies in the dining room as well.  A flat hand or pointed fist is how you should show direction.

8.  Don’t call a female guest “Mam” or “Hun”.  Mams & Huns hate that!  Call them Miss.

9.  Don’t stand akimbo at a table (hands at hips).  Don’t stand with your hands in your pocket.  Stand with your arms at your side, clasped in front of you or clasped behind you.  This shows attention without showing a casual or over-familiar attitude.

10.  Present food open handed.  What is open handed?  If you could immediately and easily hug your customer after you set down their food that is open handed.  If when you set down their food Serving: Common Wrong Ways of Doing Common Thingsyou could immediately and easily elbow them in the face, it’s not.

11.  Do not auction food.  Unless you work at Denny’s, Denny’s servers have a free pass. If you don’t work at Denny’s, know who ordered what before you get to the table.

12.  Don’t tell a guest how you are unless you are doing good.  If they say “how are you?” DO NOT tell them ANYTHING negative.  A customer should never have to hear that your house burned down, you’re tired or you’re having a bad night. When they ask how you are, treat it as a nicety and nicely reply.

13.  Don’t touch your face in front of guests.

14.  Don’t touch your hair in front of guests.

15.  Don’t interrupt your guest’s conversation.  If they are in conversation, go to your “speaking spot” at the table, count to five, if they don’t give you attention then walk away and try back in a few minutes.  Do this as many times as it takes.

16.  When asking permission to remove dinnerware from someone, do not ask the guest if they are “still working” on their meal.  Remember, dining on the food that your restaurant serves is not work.  Instead, ask if they are finished “enjoying” their meal.

17.  When bussing a table, don’t stack plates on top of food or silverware.  There is a correct way of stacking plates.  Hold one plate in your hand, this plate is for silverware, share plates, bread plates and food scraps.  Place the next plate on your forearm, balancing it.  From that position add more plates to the plate nearest you and the food scraps, silverware and small plates to the plate in your hand.  When you have stacked all you can, put the plate from your hand on the top of the plate stack nearest you.   You are left with a nice, neat, manageable stack of plates.

18.  When presenting plates to guests you should not have your thumb on the plate.  Carry with the meat of your thumb/palm as much as possible.

Serving: Common Wrong Ways of Doing Common Things

19.  When possible, remove from the right; deliver from the left…unless it is soup.  Soup is delivered or poured from the right.

20.  Do you follow a set direction on the floor?  Developing a traffic map will make service more seamless and less clumsy.

21.  When presenting a bottle of wine for a table, remember to place the cork on something, never just place it on the table. Your goal is to keep the table free of clutter and clean, not add to its messiness.

22.  Do you leave the cork on the table?  You shouldn’t…unless they want to keep it, so always ask. The idea here is table maintenance.  One of your constant goals is keeping the table free of clutter, mess or debris.  An unwanted cork on the table is a mess, clutter and debris.

 

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