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Learn how to buy the right restaurant equipment and supplies right here.

Star Manufacturing: Whatever You Need In Countertop Cooking Equipment

Star Manufacturing has been in the commercial cooking equipment business for a long time.  And their equipment has proven itself in the tough working conditions of commercial kitchens time and time again.  Star is probably best known for its countertop cooking equipment, and accessories like griddles, charbroilers, hot plates and hot dog cooking equipment…

Star Manufacturing: Whatever You Need In Countertop Cooking Equipment

Star hot dog cookers are some of the best in the business

Star Manufacturing: Whatever You Need In Countertop Cooking Equipment

Star charbroilers – radiant, lava rock, electric, and outdoor available

Star Manufacturing: Whatever You Need In Countertop Cooking Equipment

 

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Go Green, Save Money, Serve Better Produce

Go Green, Save Money, Serve Better ProduceAs the past few years have shown, produce can be a food safety liability for anyone in the food service industry. Easy spoilage also makes produce a very difficult item to manage on your inventory. On top of all that, produce takes a lot of time and labor to prep.

Yet fruits and vegetables are also a vital ingredient on any restaurant’s menu, and most of you out there have mastered the fine art of serving clean, healthy, fresh produce to your customers on a daily basis. Mastery of that art comes at a price, however. Chemical sanitization, cleaning, and spoilage all cost money and cut into your food margin.

Locally and organically produced produce don’t help your cause any either. Typically local and organic produce spoils faster even though it arrives fresher. And nobody wants their organic produce sanitized with chemicals after arriving through your back door.

There must be some kind of product that addresses all the issues you have dealing with fresh produce in your restaurant.

Well, I’m glad you asked.

The Saf-T-Wash by San Jamar addresses all three of your main food service sanitation concerns when it comes to produce: sanitation, freshness, and spoilage. How does it work? The Saf-T-Wash adds ozone to water and attaches directly to the faucet in your kitchen, allowing you to wash fresh produce and sanitize it at the same time while extending shelf life.

Ozone is a natural element that’s been used for years in the bottled water industry to kill pathogens during the bottling process. Ozone kills at least 99.99% of the major pathogens found in produce within two minutes of exposure, which is significantly more effective than a chlorine treatment. And ozone removes enzymes from fruits and vegetables that cause spoilage, improving shelf life after prep has been completed.

You also don’t have to use as much ozone treated water to clean produce during prep, saving you money on water. In general, treating your fruits and vegetables with ozone treated water is a more effective and efficient way to prep produce for serving. According to San Jamar, the money saved in water and labor savings plus reduced spoilage means the Saf-T-Wash pays for itself in 3 months.

Using the Saf-T-Wash also gives you a unique opportunity to market your restaurant as a green operation to your customers. Despite the economic downturn, studies still return consistent results when it comes to customer attitudes regarding green practices in food safety: consumers want more of it and they like restaurants that participate in green programs. If you’re serving organically grown produce washed with ozone treated water, you’re creating a great opportunity to add value to your restaurant brand in the eyes of your customer. And in an age of price wars and increasingly brutal competition, anything that sets you apart and adds value is something that might give you an extra edge over your competition.

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Fryer Oil Maintenance: Tips To Make Oil Taste Better & Last Longer

Fryer Oil Maintenance: Tips To Make Oil Taste Better & Last LongerThe fryer is one of the central cooking appliances in many restaurants and commercial kitchens.  And central to every commercial fryer is the shortening or oil in the vat.  Maintaining that oil is key to producing great-tasting product every time.  Oil maintenance is more involved than you might think, and if done properly, can add significant time to the productive life of your fryer oil and improve the taste of your product.

Fryer oil is an organic compound.  That means it breaks down naturally over time, just like any of the food product in your walk-in.  At over 300 degrees Fahrenheit, that degradation process is accelerated.  As if that weren’t enough, three things contribute to the even more rapid deterioration of fryer oil:

  • Oxidation – contact with air makes the oil “stale” over time, just like a bag of chips.
  • Hydrolysis – the presence of water in fryer oil is unavoidable when frying food product, but as water interacts with the hot oil, acidic compounds form that can really affect taste.
  • Polymerization – As oil breaks down, compounds form and bond together, which leads to surface foaming and the further breakdown of oil quality and taste.  This process is made even worse by food particles, which will inevitably collect in the oil as product is cooked.

There are several things you can do to combat the three enemies of oil quality.  Here’s some tips that address each one specifically:

Fighting oxidation: minimize fryer oil contact with the air whenever possible.  The most common method for doing this is to cover the fryer vat when the unit is shut down.  Also regulate oil temperature so that it doesn’t exceed 360 degrees Fahrenheit.  During lulls, reduce heat to 280 degrees.

Fighting hydrolysis: don’t fill fryer baskets directly over the fryer vat.  This is especially true for frozen product, because ice crystals will end up in the oil.  Of the three, hydrolysis is the hardest to fight, because there is going to be water in everything you cook.

Fighting polymerization: again, don’t fill fryer baskets over the vat.  Food particles speed polymerization, so a good technique is to load the fryer basket away from the vat and give it a few good shakes to allow any free particles to fall away before the product takes the plunge.  Another polymerization agent are seasonings, especially salt.  Add any seasoning away from the vat to keep them out of the oil as much as possible.

Of course, no matter how hard you fight, eventually it’s going to be a losing battle.  Water, air, and particulates are going to end up in your fryer oil no matter what you do.  Your only choice is to take them back out before the oil breaks down.  You can do this effectively with a good filtration system.

How much you filter your fryer oil depends on what you’re cooking, in what volume, and how often.  In general, breaded foods like fried chicken or fish mean you should filter more often, because of all the food particles that are going to end up in the oil.  French fries are much cleaner and therefore the oil can handle a lot more rounds before filtering.

Fryer Oil Maintenance: Tips To Make Oil Taste Better & Last LongerNo matter what, you should develop a filtering schedule.  Fryer oil test strips are the best way to keep track of oil quality, and they’ll give you a starting point for your filter schedule.  Filtering fryer oil greatly extends the life of the oil, and smart restaurant operators filter the same oils several times to get the maximum life out of it before having to refill.

Portable fryer filters provide an easy way to filter fryer oil without slowing your busy kitchen down too much.  And when you’ve squeezed every last minute of cooking capability out of that vat of oil, dispose of it safely with an oil transporter.  Finally, use a Smart Spout for pouring new oil into the vat without spilling.Fryer Oil Maintenance: Tips To Make Oil Taste Better & Last Longer

Before you refill with a new batch of oil, however, you’ve got to clean that fryer vat out.  It’s a thankless job, but someone’s got to get in there and remove as much of that great friends of polymerization, food particulates, as possible.  Especially focus on cleaning the “cool zone,” the area underneath the burners in the vat where particles are intentionally concentrated in order to prevent them from heating up too much during cooking.  A water/vinegar mix is a great way to make sure detergents are neutralized after you’ve thoroughly cleaned the vat.

Maintaining fryer oil quality takes a lot of work.  But in the end, it’s worth the extra effort because you get a lot more mileage out of each vat of oil.  And if saving money isn’t enough of an incentive for you, then the prospect of serving great tasting fried foods to your customers every time should do the trick.

If you’re in the market for a new fryer, check out this commercial fryer buying guide.

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Restaurant Hood Filters: A Buying And Maintenance Guide

Restaurant Hood Filters: A Buying And Maintenance GuideMaintaining and replacing the hood filter in your commercial ventilation system is more important than you might think.  The hood filter is a metal square or rectangle that fits into the opening on your hood ventilation system.  Its purpose is to filter out grease from the smoke rising off your cooking equipment.  If this smoke were left unfiltered, it would build up over time in the ventilation system and become a major fire risk.

Therefore maintaining and replacing these filters is an important task.  Some things you should know about commercial hood filters:

Types of Hood Filters

Unless your cooking equipment is burning mesquite or some other sort of solid fuel, your hood ventilation system is using a baffle filter.  Baffle filters are most commonly made out of one of three types of metal:

  • Galvanized – these filters are the least expensive option.  They are rarely used in open kitchens where customers can see them because they have a dull appearance
  • Aluminum – these hood filters have an appealing sheen to them, making them usable in open kitchens, but they are prone to corrosion after repeated cleanings
  • Stainless Steel – these filters are by far the most durable.  They are also appealing to look at and can be used in an open kitchen.  They are less prone to corrosion than aluminum as long as they are not cleaned using bleach or other chemicals

Cleaning Hood Filters

Hood filters should be cleaned every day to keep them free of grease and maximize their filtering capability.  If you have a high temp dishwasher, run your hood filters through the dishwasher.  Make sure you don’t use any bleach when you clean hood filters as this will cause rapid corrosion!

If your dishwasher uses any kind of chemical, do not use it to clean hood filters.  Instead, clean the grease out of your hood filters with hot soapy water and dry them immediately after.

If grease is allowed to build up in hood filters, the risk of fire in your kitchen becomes very high.  The more packed with grease filters become, the less they filter from the smoke passing through your ventilation system.  That means the unfiltered grease ends up in the ducting, and if enough builds up, it could catch fire, potentially causing thousands of dollars worth of damage.

When To Replace Your Hood Filter

Conduct regular visual inspections of your restaurant’s hood filters.  If corrosion, dents, or wear has created holes or disfiguration in the baffles, then it’s time to replace them.  It’s important to replace worn hood filters as quickly as possible.  Otherwise, grease will build up in the ducting of your ventilation system, and this can pose a very serious fire risk.

Sizing And Replacing Your Hood Filter

Properly sizing your hood filter is the most important thing you’ll do before ordering a new one.  Hood filters are typically sized ½ inch smaller in vertical and horizontal dimensions than the nominal sizes listed for your hood ventilation system.  In other words, if the hood opening is 20” x 20”, the correct sized hood filter for that system is 19 ½ “ tall by 19 ½ “ wide.

To determine the vertical height of the filter, measure parallel to the baffles from edge to edge.  The horizontal width is the distance from edge to edge perpendicular to the direction of the baffles.

To replace your hood filter, lift the old filter out of the slot rail in which it rests and slide it out.  Slide the new filter all the way into the slot opening and then drop the end into the rail.  Make sure you insert the hood filter with the baffles in a vertical position!  This means the lines in the filter are running up and down and not side to side.  Installing hood filters the wrong way means the grease will not drain properly and cause clogging.

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Buy The Right Flatware For Your Restaurant

When purchasing flatware for your restaurant or commercial kitchen, the two most important factors to consider are the type of stainless steel the flatware is made from and the weight of the flatware you want to buy.

18/10 vs. 18/0 Stainless Steel

Buy The Right Flatware For Your Restaurant

Windsor pattern flatware

All flatware is made of stainless steel, but not all types of stainless steel are the same.  The term “stainless” is actually a misnomer because stainless steel does in fact stain and rust over time.  Most stainless steel is mixed with other metals like chromium and nickel to improve durability and rust resistance.

The amount and type of metals added to the steel affects your flatware’s performance and cost:

18/0 flatware contains 18% chromium and 0% nickel.  The chromium forms a thin layer over the steel, making it stronger.  18/0 flatware is more affordable than 18/10 flatware but stains and rusts more easily and isn’t as shiny.

18/10 flatware has 18% chromium and 10% nickel.  The nickel gives the flatware a bright shine and is less susceptible to staining and rust.

Flatware Weight

Flatware is also made in different weight classes.  The heavier the weight, the sturdier the flatware, but also the more expensive it will be.  There are four common weights:

Medium weight flatware. Also known as “economy weight,” this flatware is easily bendable and has a relatively short lifespan.  It is, however, very affordable compared to other types of flatware.  This type of flatware is ideal for restaurants where flatware is frequently lost.

Buy The Right Flatware For Your Restaurant

Dominion Heavy Duty Flatware

Heavy Duty flatware. This flatware is probably the most common.  It is much sturdier than medium weight flatware but can still be bent by hand.

Extra Heavy Duty flatware. This is the heaviest weight flatware and is by far the strongest.  Heavier duty flatware costs more up front but lasts longer and is less prone to breaking or bending.

European Style flatware. European dinner knives and dinner forks are about a third heavier and a third larger than normal heavy duty flatware.  This type of flatware is most commonly found in high end restaurants.

Caring For Flatware

Flatware is a large up-front expense for any restaurant or commercial kitchen, but at least once you purchase flatware, especially if it’s heavier duty, it will last a long time.  However, improper care can cause flatware to tarnish or rust and reduce its usable lifespan.  A few simple care techniques can help maximize your flatware investment:

Pre-Soak your flatware for about 10 minutes before washing. Pre-soaking for longer times isn’t recommended as this encourages rust to start forming.  If possible, remove food bits manually with a soapy sponge or a pre-rinse.  Don’t use an abrasive pad as this scratches the finish and encourages rust to start developing.  Washing flatware as soon as possible after it has been used is ideal to help prevent tarnishing.

Use flatware holders to store and transport flatware. Do not use aluminum or metal pans for pre-soaking or transporting your flatware because the metals interact with chlorine in the water and speed the oxidization (or rusting) of stainless steel.

Use a high temperature dishwasher to wash flatware. Most restaurants and commercial kitchens already have a high temp dishwasher to meet NSF regulations.  However, if you don’t, avoid using chlorine or bleach products to sanitize stainless flatware as these chemicals will damage it.

It’s also recommended to use a scale inhibitor filter on the water line to your dishwasher.  A scale inhibitor removes minerals from the water, preventing harmful buildups on your flatware.

Dry flatware quickly. As soon as possible after washing your flatware, dry it and store it where it will stay dry.  Wetness is the friend of rust and therefore the enemy of your flatware.  Most commercial dishwashers have a drying cycle, but this doesn’t always get flatware completely dry.  It’s a good idea to wipe down your flatware after it comes out of the dishwasher.

Don’t use abrasive detergents or materials. Whenever you clean flatware, avoid anything abrasive that will score or scratch the stainless steel surface.  Those scratches penetrate the thin film coating of chromium and nickel on your flatware that protects the steel from rusting and tarnishing.

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Why Buying Hobart Mixer Attachments Shouldn’t Cost You An Arm and a Leg

Why Buying Hobart Mixer Attachments Shouldn’t Cost You An Arm and a LegAnyone with a Hobart mixer in their restaurant or commercial kitchen will tell you what a great machine it is.  These mixers last a long time despite constant, heavy use, and for many kitchens they are essential to the success of daily operations.  Often the attachments that make your Hobart mixer so indispensable wear out or break long before the machine itself does.

That’s good in the sense that Hobart’s tank-like mixers are a seriously long-term investment that pays off big time in reliability and durability.  But it’s also bad in the sense that Hobart likes to charge an arm and a leg for their mixer attachments.  Dough hooks, mixer bowls, flat beaters, pastry knives, graters/shredders, you name it, if Hobart makes it, they’re going to make you pay for it.

That leaves you with two choices:

1)  Hobble around a limbless freak but have nice, shiny new Hobart brand name attachments on your mixer
2) Forego prosthetics and buy generic attachments

I’m sure you know where Hobart comes down on this issue.  Their attachments are high quality, and cheap knock-offs are likely to break, underperform, and cause you all kinds of problems that will make you wish you had never valued your limbs so much.

It’s true, there are some cheap mixer attachments out there.  But what’s also true is that you can buy high quality, durable mixer attachments that fit any Hobart mixer but do not carry the Hobart name.  These mixer attachments are equal in quality to anything Hobart makes, and they’re also a fraction of the cost.  So no matter what kind of mixer attachment you need, get quality replacements that have everything a Hobart brand name attachment has, except the Hobart name stamped on it.

If you are in the market, here’s some key things to keep in mind before you buy:

Determine if your Hobart mixer is a Standard or a Legacy HL model.  Standard Hobart mixers are older models.  The attachments for Standard models slide onto the mixer shaft and twist into place.  Legacy HL mixers are newer models.  The attachments for Legacy HL models slide onto the mixer shaft and lock into place with a pin.  Make sure you buy the right kind of attachment according to the type of Hobart mixer you have!Why Buying Hobart Mixer Attachments Shouldn’t Cost You An Arm and a Leg

Look for shredder/grater attachments with German steel blades.  German steel is hardened, which means the blade lasts longer and cuts sharper than your average steel blade.  Any extra cost is more than made up by how well this blade will cut over the long term.

Keeping your Hobart mixer going with new attachments shouldn’t feel like buying a whole new mixer.  Buying smart by finding high quality generic replacements will save you a lot of dough, and won’t force you to sacrifice any quality (or body parts).

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Restaurant Equipment: 4 Factors For Calculating Total Cost Of Ownership (cont)

There’s always a significant amount of cost involved whenever you buy a new piece of restaurant equipment.  Those costs only continue as that equipment ages in your restaurant – from energy use to repairs, the consequences of new equipment will be around for a long time after you’ve written the check to purchase.

Of course, restaurant equipment makes you money as well.  Without that fryer or reach-in refrigerator or griddle, you wouldn’t be able to prepare your product for your customers.  But understanding the total cost of a piece of equipment over its lifespan has been ignored all too often in the food service industry for years.

Many chains have started doing Total Cost Of Ownership analyses for equipment because they buy large numbers of the same type of equipment all at once.  A faulty or inefficient piece of equipment can mean thousands of dollars in extra expenses for the chain over the lifespan of the piece, and conducting a cost analysis beforehand helps avoid problems down the road.

By and large, most independent operators do not undertake the complicated task of calculating total cost – usually because the information or the know-how necessary to make an accurate calculation isn’t available.

That doesn’t mean independents and smaller chains can’t benefit from a cost analysis before they buy new restaurant equipment.  In a continuation of yesterday’s post, here are two more factors to consider when calculating the total cost of a piece of equipment over its lifespan:

Restaurant Equipment: 4 Factors For Calculating Total Cost Of Ownership (cont)Service and Parts Availability.
Every food service operator loathes equipment downtime.  If your equipment isn’t working, you’re losing money.  Therefore it’s usually a good idea to do some research on the availability of equipment services and parts in your area before you buy.  It’s also good to get an idea of how easy it is to make do-it-yourself repairs on a unit that will save yourself an expensive service call.

There are many quality manufacturers in the food service sector who design units that are easy to pull apart and fix common component failures.  If you’re shopping around, make sure you ask about common parts and how they can be fixed on each unit so you can get a better idea of how quickly (and affordably!) you can fix those problems down the road.

Finally, consider the availability of generic parts for new restaurant equipment pieces.  Generic parts can save you a considerable sum of money if they are available for the unit you own, and are equal to or better in quality than Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) parts.

Ease Of Use. Energy efficiency is important, but so is labor efficiency.  A piece of equipment that’s difficult or dangerous to operate means more training time and a higher incidence of work-related injuries.  In a high turnover industry like food service, equipment that requires a lot of training to operate simply doesn’t make any sense.

In addition, difficult to operate equipment slows down production and reduces worker efficiency, which can bring some pretty high costs in a high-pressure environment like a restaurant kitchen.  When people order food, they want it quickly and usually at the same time as a lot of other customers.  Easy to use equipment that promotes employee efficiency rather than hindering it is an important cost to factor into your buying decisions.

Considering these factors before you buy a new piece of equipment will help you make an informed decision that goes beyond simply finding the lowest price.  In many cases, the initial price tag has little to do with how much that piece of equipment will actually cost you over its entire lifespan.  A total cost analysis helps you make a more informed decision.

If you’re interested in a more in-depth analysis of total cost, try this standard practice resource from ASTM International.

Read the first installment of this article.

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Why Buying Scales Will Save You Money

Why Buying Scales Will Save You MoneyI’m not telling you anything new when I tell you that inventory control is very important in any restaurant.  But I think it’s surprising just how few restaurants view the use of scales as a way to manage shrink and really control how food product is used.  In fact, scales should be the central tool in any restaurant manager’s quest to make sure everything that comes in the restaurant goes out as a finished product a customer is paying for.

The best place to start is with a receiving scale.  As product rolls in the back door off the truck, weigh each bulk item and record the weight.  That way you know exactly how much of each kind of ingredient you have available.  This helps you in two ways:

  1. You’ll know exactly when it’s time to order more product
  2. If you’re out of product, but you only sold X number of entrees that use that product (i.e. not enough of them to be out), inventory shrink is happening, and it’s time to hunt down the culprit

Portion scales are a necessary compliment to your receiving scale.  After all, if you’re measuring what’s coming in but not what’s going out, you’ll have a hard time managing your inventory.  There are two kinds of portion scales: mechanical scales and digital scales.

Mechanical portion scales indicate weights on a large, easy-to-read dial.  These scales are ideal for measuring bulky items that you’re cooking in large quantities, like french fries or chicken wings.  You sacrifice a little bit of accuracy for speed and convenience, which makes sense if you’re just pounding out apps on Super Bowl Sunday.

Why Buying Scales Will Save You Money

Digital portion scales are much more accurate and allow you to measure ingredients with precision.  Use these scales for measuring out the ingredients to your restaurant’s world famous secret sauce, anything that needs to be baked, and other multi-ingredient recipes.  The nice thing about digital scales is that you can reset the tare and calculate ingredient proportions very easily.

For those of you who don’t know, the tare on a scale is a feature that tells the scale to ignore the current weight on the scale and measure additional weight from zero.  In other words, the mixing bowl you put on the scale will weigh zero once you press the tare button and the scale will only register the weight of the ingredients you add to it.

You can measure ingredient proportions on a digital scale easily and much more accurately than with measuring cups because different ingredients compact differently in a measuring cup.  Flour is the best example.  A cup of flour can weigh between 4 and 6 ounces, depending on how compacted it is in the cup.  If you extrapolate that out to 4 cups of flour, you’ve got up to a 50% difference in the weight of the flour.

You can also calculate proportions more easily with a portion scale because you know how much ingredients that are hard to measure with a cup weigh, like eggs.  A recipe for pasta might call for three parts flour to two parts egg.  If two eggs weigh four ounces, then you know you need six ounces of flour.

Finally, scales can help you manage another extremely important inventory item in your restaurant: alcohol.  Use a liquor scale to measure the remaining amount of alcohol in each bottle at the end of the day and record the amount.  I’ve seen managers go through this exercise countless times, but never with a scale.  Usually they just look at the bottle and estimate how much is left.

You depend on alcohol sales to contribute to your bottom line entirely too much for such an inaccurate evaluation of inventory.  A liquor scale takes the guesswork out of the equation and allows you to compare hard numbers with your sales so that you can spot shrink and put a stop to it quickly.

Scales mean accuracy.  Accuracy means less waste.  Less waste means less cost.  Less cost equals more profit.  The equation is as simple as that.

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How A Low Flow Valve Can Improve Your Cash Flow (AND Green Cred)

How A Low Flow Valve Can Improve Your Cash Flow (AND Green Cred)

T&S Brass Water Saver Pre-Rinse Spray Valve

Your restaurant uses a lot of water.  Between the water you serve your guests, the ice machine, the dish machine, and the sink, any restaurant goes through a lot of water on a daily basis.  I don’t have to tell you how much that water costs you.  I’m sure you’re reminded every time you look at your monthly utilities bill.

When you go through as much water as a restaurant does in one month, even a small adjustment in daily water usage can make a huge difference in how much money you spend.  And sometimes those small adjustments can be astoundingly easy.

Take, for example, the spray valve on your pre-rinse assembly.  Naturally, you want a strong flow of water so that dishes can be quickly rinsed before they go into the dish machine.  The problem with a strong flow is that a lot of water gets used very quickly, and that costs you money.

In recent years low flow spray valves have become very popular for this very reason.  A low flow valve uses a fraction of the water per minute as older spray valves.  Over the course of a year, a low flow valve can save you thousands of gallons in water usage and therefore hundreds of dollars on utilities.
But will a low flow spray valve clean dishes?  The term “low flow” certainly doesn’t sound like something that powers food bits off very quickly.

How A Low Flow Valve Can Improve Your Cash Flow (AND Green Cred)
It took a company with a reputation like T&S to engineer a low flow valve that didn’t sacrifice any of the performance anyone would expect out of their pre-rinse.  Their new low flow spray valves clean dishes just as quickly or even faster than any other manufacturer.  Even better, T&S low flow spray valves use half the water as the competition, which can translate into as much as 100,000 gallons of water a year.

Making your restaurant more green is so overused these days it’s become cliché.  But when something as simple as changing out the spray valve on your pre-rinse can save you this much money, and bolster your greening efforts at the same time, what’s not to love?  It’s a win-win for your restaurant.

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Restaurant Cutlery Q & A: Finding And Maintaining The Best Blade

What’s the big deal with  santoku knives?Restaurant Cutlery Q & A: Finding And Maintaining The Best Blade

A santoku knife is a more versatile version of a cook’s knife, with a thinner blade that allows for finer slicing and mincing.  Some chefs swear by the santoku, claiming it has better balance.  In general, a cook’s knife is going to be better for larger, heavier chopping and cutting while a santoku blade is best used for thinner chopping and cutting tasks.  The “granton” or scalloped blade on a santoku knife makes the blade less sticky when cutting very thin slices, allowing them to peel off the blade more easily.

What does high carbon mean?

High carbon stainless steel, interestingly enough, has a higher carbon content than most other types of stainless steel.  This type of steel is used in professional cutlery because it allows the manufacturer to “temper” the blade.  Tempering is a heating and cooling process during forging that tapers the blade without making it brittle.  Higher carbon steel is more tolerant of this process.

Restaurant Cutlery Q & A: Finding And Maintaining The Best BladeWhat is a bird’s beak paring knife?

“Bird’s beak” refers to the downward slant at the tip of the spine of the blade on a paring knife.  This type of paring knife makes it easy to peel and cut round objects like fruits and vegetables, and is most often used for garnishes in commercial kitchens.

Is a serrated slicer knife better than a straight edge?

The short answer is that it depends.  Serrated edges stay sharp longer but are also more difficult to sharpen.  If you’re looking for a good, durable knife that doesn’t slice very thin, then a serrated edge slicer is a good bet.  Straight edge slicers are perfect for making paper-thin cuts on a consistent basis, like on a big hunk of roast beef.  They dull more quickly and are maybe a little less durable, but when you need thin, straight is the answer.

Why would I want an offset bread knife?

The offset handle on a bread knife means you don’t whack your knuckles on the counter every time you slice a piece of bread.  It’s a very nice feature if you’re cutting a lot of bread in a hurry.

How often should I sharpen my knives?Restaurant Cutlery Q & A: Finding And Maintaining The Best Blade

To maintain a perfect cutting edge, use a manual sharpener daily to remove burrs and restore a sharper edge.  Over time, however, the blade angle will need to be reset periodically, something an electric knife sharpener is far more effective at accomplishing.  As the blade wears down from daily use and daily sharpening, the angle gets larger, which makes it harder to get an edge out of a cursory daily sharpening.  A two or three stage electric sharpener restores this blade angle by regrinding the blade.  It depends on how much you use your cutlery, but in general the angle should be reset about once a month.

Is a diamond coated grinder better for sharpening?

In a word: yes.  A diamond coated grinder shaves away steel at a much cooler temperature than a normal grinder.  This is important because heat will “detemper” the steel of a knife blade, making it more brittle and more prone to nicking and dulling.

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