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Get updates on great restaurant equipment and supplies that are must-haves in any restaurant or commercial kitchen.

Product Spotlight: Sharp Commercial Microwaves

Product Spotlight: Sharp Commercial Microwaves

Did you know that Sharp Corporation started in Japan in 1912 with a line of groundbreaking mechanical pencils?

Over a century later, Sharp is still on the technological vanguard, and their stellar lineup of commercial microwaves is a perfect illustration of their pedigree and enduring commitment to innovation.

Combining reliability with power, simplicity with sophistication, Sharp commercial microwaves have earned fans in high-output restaurants and home kitchens.

Large Capacity, Compact Design

Sharp microwaves manage a paradoxical feat: they have a small footprint AND a roomy interior. How do they pull it off? With clever design, Sharp microwaves deliver evenly cooked food without the space-wasting turntable of domestic ovens, allowing every inch of space available to be used.

What’s more, without the usual merry-go-round to complicate cleanup, the inside is easy to keep sanitary.

Two Grades to Choose From

  1. Sharp Heavy-Duty Series microwaves, ranging from 1200 to 2200 watts, are the workhorses of the bunch. They’re great for big jobs requiring maximum efficiency and output. Choose from models with up to 11 power levels and 20 touch-pad memories.
  2. Sharp Medium Duty Series microwaves, each packing 1000 watts, offer the durability and simplicity of a stainless steel interior, with a tough handle that will endure a lifetime of abuse. Whether you choose the spartan R-21LCF or the feature-rich R-21LTF and R-21LVF models, you’re going to enjoy rock-solid durability and peak performance.

Efficiency-Boosting Controls

Streamlined programming means streamlined kitchen operations. What’s more, Sharp offers models with Twin Touch capability, an innovation that features dual control panels on the top and bottom so the buttons can be reached wherever the microwave is placed, making it easy to use in small places.

Sometimes you need options, but other times they just get in the way. Whichever camp you’re in, Sharp has a microwave for you, from a pared-down model with just one power level and handful of memories to an all-the-bells-and-whistles-included model with 11 power levels and even more pre-programmed memories.

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Induction Cookware Made Simple

Induction Cookware Made Simple

The notion and method of induction cooking has been making its way into commercial kitchens for a while now. Impressive, attractive induction cooktops have saturated the market, and while the science behind the technology is sound, many consumers are still hesitant to take the plunge. We’re not here to try and convince you to jump on the induction cooking bandwagon, but if induction is the way you’d like to go it’s important to know what type of cookware will work with your fancy new cooktop.

From stock and sauce pots to braziers, steamers, roasting, grill, and fry pans, cookware comes in a wide range of shapes, sizes, and materials. Over time, and through trial and error, many cooks come to trust a particular brand or learn to stick with a specific material. Unfortunately, there’s a possibility you’re go-to pots and pans might not work on an induction burner.

Will It Work On An Induction Cooktop?

  • Stainless Steel
  • Cast Iron

  • Non-Magnetic Stainless Steel
  • Aluminum
  • Copper

Why?

Complex science aside, it’s the magnetism of the material used in a particular pan that’s important. The kiss between an induction cooktop’s electromagnetic coil and the base of a pan is what causes those metaphorical sparks to fly (no actual sparking occurs). With the right material (magnetic stainless steel and cast iron), it’s love at first site.

With the wrong materials (100% aluminum and copper), it’s the cold shoulder from both parties. Most induction cooktops don’t want anything to do with these “bad” metals, and when they are detected, the cooktop won’t even turn on.

The Magnet Test

Induction Cookware Made Simple

One of the most common ways to determine whether a pot or pan is induction ready is to do a magnet test. Unofficially named, but widely accepted, the method to this magnetic madness is easy. Simply take an everyday magnet and press it up against the bottom of a piece of cookware. If the magnet sticks then the cookware is induction ready.

Be sure to test the base of the pot or pan as opposed to the sides. Many cookware designs use different metals sandwiched together for the core/base to create optimum cooking conditions (see below). This core is all it takes to make a pan induction ready.

Induction Ready Aluminum and Copper Pans

If aluminum or copper is your cookware cup of tea don’t rule out an induction cooktop just yet. Some aluminum and copper cookware is created with a stainless steel sandwich on the bottom, and the incorporation of induction compatible materials as a base or core makes all the difference.

An aluminum pan, which is great for heat conductivity and even distribution, is shunned by the induction cooker (and vice-versa). But, once paired with a stainless steel base, the aluminum pan can now let the electromagnet work its magic. The induction burner gets turned on, the pan gets hot and bothered, and tasty little baby foods can be made.

So, when on the prowl for a new piece of induction ready cookware don’t immediately rule out anything copper or aluminum – read the details on the pan, and if all else fails whip out your trusty magnet.

Make Your Own Recipe

Cooking your cuisine using an electromagnet may seem futuristic to some, but for many chefs who have adopted the technology into their back line, it’s a welcome change of pace. Literally.

Induction cooking has been shown to heat pans almost instantly, and boiling water takes a fraction of the time as it would using traditional cooking methods. That said, cooking different foods requires different degrees of finesse, and with any new kitchen toy, the style and design of your tools is only part of the recipe.

Visit our main site to see a list of all of Tundra’s induction cooking products.

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A Bartender’s Glassware Guide: Does Your Glass Have Class?

A Bartender’s Glassware Guide: Does Your Glass Have Class?Aside from knowing how to mix hundreds of cocktails, a bartender must know what type of glass to pour their mouth-watering drinks and cocktails into. So, to make life just a tad bit easier we have smashed our brains together to develop a restaurant glassware guide that will make your toes curl with joy.

Wine Glasses:

White Wine Glass: Sizes range from 5-10 ounces, but the most practical size for a white wine glass is 6-8 ounces. Forms vary from balloon shaped to straight sided to tulip shaped.

What to Drink:
Chardonnay, Pinot Grigio, Gewurztraminer, Muscat / Moscato, Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Viognier

Red Wine Glass: The large size of this balloon glass allows wine to breath. Sizes typically range from 8-14 ounces.

What to Drink: Pinot Noir, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Zinfandel, Syrah, Shiraz, Sangiovese, Malbec

Sherry Glass: The smallest of the wine glasses holds from 4-6 ounces. It can also be used for liqueur-based drinks.

What to Drink: Sherry, Port, Aperitifs, Liqueurs, Layers Shooters

Flute: The Champagne Flute is a tall, thin, tapered glass that holds between 7 and 11 ounces and is perfect for Champagne Cocktails. The purpose of the flute design is to keep the bubbles in the flute longer; with less surface area exposed to the air, the bubbles can’t escape as fast.

What do Drink: Champagne, Sparkling Wines, Bellini’s, Prosecco’s, Mimosa’s, Asti, Champagne Cocktails

Cocktail Glasses:

Old Fashioned: Sometimes called lowball or rocks glass, the Old Fashioned Glass is a squat tumbler with a heavy base that holds approximately 5 – 10 ounces and is the most versatile. Typically used for short mixed drinks and anything on the rocks.

What to Drink: Scotch, Whisky, Old Fashioned, Black/White Russians, Mai Tais

Collins Glass: An optional addition to the bar as it is interchangeable with the highball glass. Used primarily for any Collins drink, it is a narrow tumbler that holds between 8 and 12 ounces.

What to Drink: Collins, Fizz, Zombies, Long Islands, Sours, MojitoA Bartender’s Glassware Guide: Does Your Glass Have Class?

Highball Glass: Highball Glasses are large tumblers with heavy bases that hold between 8 and 12 ounces and can easily replace a Collins glass. This glass is generally used for mixed drinks.

What to Drink: Bloody Marys, Vodka Cranberry, Gin & Tonic, Scotch & Soda, Bourbon & Coke, 7 & 7, Moscow Mule, Fuzzy Navels, Screwdrivers

Cocktail Glass: The familiar conical shape of the Cocktail Glass makes most of us think of Martinis and so it should. Nowadays, Cocktail glasses range from a 6 ounce glass to a huge 16 ouncer (too much of a good thing?)

What to Drink: Martinis, Manhattans, Cosmopolitans

Snifter: A Snifter comes in a variety of sizes and is the traditional vessel for brandy and cognac served neat. Its large bowl is cupped in your hand to warm the contents. Snifters can also be used for some cocktails.

What to Drink: Brandy, Cognac, Whisky, Barleywine

Margarita Glass: While most margarita glasses have a narrow neck, some are balloon shaped. Capacity ranges from 12 – 16 ounces.

What to Drink: Margaritas, Daiquiris

Shooter: This 1 1/2-2 ounce glass is used for drinking shots but can also be used as a measuring tool when mixing cocktails.
What to Drink: Tequila, Whisky, Mixed Shots

Hurricane Glass: Typically used for blended and frozen tropical cocktails. The distinct pear-shaped curve of this glass is reminiscent of vintage hurricane lamps and holds between 10-12 ounces.

What to Drink: Piña Coladas, Rum Punch, Coco Coladas, Tropical Fruit Drinks, Daiquiris

Irish Coffee Glass: The Irish Coffee Glass replaces the average mug for good-looking hot cocktails. This footed glass mug holds between 8 and 12 ounces and is made of heat-resistant glass.

What to Drink: Hot Toddy, Irish Coffee

Cordial Glass: Small and stemmed glasses used for serving small portions of your favorite liquors at times such as after a meal.

What to Drink: Amaretto , Grand Marnier, Cordials

Beer Glasses:

A Bartender’s Glassware Guide: Does Your Glass Have Class?

Pint/Pub Glass: Cylindrical glass with a slight taper and a wide mouth. There are two standard sizes, the 16-ounce (US Tumbler) or the 20-ounce Imperial (Nonic), which has a small ridge towards the top, a grip of sorts and helps in stacking them.

 What to Drink: Pale Ale, IPA, Porter, Brown Ale, Red Ale, Stout, Amber Lager

 Pilsner Glass: Typically a tall, slender and tapered 12 ounce glass, shaped like a trumpet at times, that captures the sparkling effervesces and colors of a Pilsner while maintaining its head.

What to Drink: Pilsner, Dortmunder, American Lager, Bock, Pale Ale

Mug/Stein: Heavy, sturdy, large and with handle, the mug is a fun and serious piece of glassware that comes in many shapes and sizes.

What to Drink: Oktoberfest, Munich Dunkel

 Weizen Glass: These classy glasses, with their thin walls and length, showcase the beer’s color and allows for much headspace. Most are 0.5L in size.

What to Drink: Witbier White Ale, Bavarian Weizen/Weissbier, American Wheat Ale

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Food Service Product Watch: 10 Products For Your Restaurant

Food Service Product Watch: 10 Products For Your Restaurant

Every restaurant kitchen is full of tools of the trade, from heavy duty gas ranges to the lowliest spatula, it takes a lot of equipment to serve your customers right – day in and day out.  Keeping track of all the equipment and products that can help make your operation run more smoothly could be a full time job in itself, and I know you don’t have the time for another full time job.

These Back Burner posts cover some products that might be of use in your commercial kitchen.  Feel free to browse through and see if you find something you like:

  1. Crocs Shoes For Food Service Professionals - These Crocs are designed specifically for the food service industry and have proven to be a hit with the chefs and waitstaff that have tried them.
  2. Two Levels Of Oven Mitt – There’s your standard, garden variety oven mitt and then there’s Tucker, which takes the commercial oven mitt to a whole new level of safety and convenience.  Learn the difference in this post.
  3. Floor Matting - If your kitchen doesn’t have floor matting, or if you need to replace the worn stuff you’ve got now, this post will help you understand why you need new matting for the sake of safety and which type will work best.
  4. The Poseidon: The New God Of Digital Portion Scales - If you haven’t heard about The Poseidon digital portion scale from Edlund, you’ve been missing out on one of the hottest new products in food service.
  5. How Ice Machine Water Filters Can Help With More Than Just Ice - If you’re not filtering the water coming out of your glass filler, you should be.  Luckily, you can easily add a water filter just like the one you use for your ice machine to produce clean, fresh, great tasting water for your customers.
  6. Restaurant Equipment Casters: Buy Smart – If you need to replace the casters on your restaurant equipment, or if you need to add casters to new equipment, read this post first to make sure you don’t pay too much and that you get the right casters the first time.
  7. The EndoTherm Thermometer: Does It Really Help You Save Energy and Improve Food Safety? – The EndoTherm is a thermometer inside a liquid gel that mimics food product in your walk-in.  This allows you to check the actual temperature of your product rather than the ambient air temperature in the walk-in giving you a more accurate sense of food temperatures.
  8. Lincoln Smallwares: A Little Cookware For Everyone – Lincoln has four lines of cookware and each one is designed for a different chef.  No matter what, you’re going to find the line that’s right for you.
  9. Hoshizaki Ice Machines: The Preferred Choice – Hoshi ice machines are a great choice if you’re in the market for ice machines.  Learn more about their products here.
  10. Krowne Underbar Equipment – You already know about Krowne’s great restaurant plumbing, but if you haven’t seen their modular underbar equipment, you’re in for a pleasant surprise.

BONUS PRODUCT: Handle Bulk Vegetable Oil The Smart Spout Way – The Smart Spout makes pouring bulk vegetable oil safer and easier.  It’s one of those simple product innovations that really makes you wonder why you didin’t have one before this.

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Product Watch: Fagor Commercial Dishwashers

Fagor commercial dishwashers are a great choice for any restaurant or commercial kitchen.  These dish machines are affordable, energy efficient, and very durable.  Fagor has always been known internationally for their quality products and it’s only recently that they’ve made a name for themselves in the U.S.

When selecting the right Fagor dish machine for your business, make sure you choose the right sized unit for the job.  Undercounter units can handle up to 35 racks per hour.  Door type units can process between 35 and 60 racks per hour.  And the Fagor single compartment conveyor dish machine can wash up to 150 racks in a single hour.

When calculating how many racks you need to wash per hour, consider the following factors:

  • About 35 racks of dishes are produced for every 100 meals served
  • Your dish machine should be able to easily handle peak demand volume like Valentine’s Day dinner rush
  • Dish machines have a 5 – 10 year lifespan, so add 10% – 20% capacity for future growth

Once you have an accurate estimate of your dishload, choose a Fagor unit that works best for your situation:Product Watch: Fagor Commercial Dishwashers

Undercounter Dishwashers – These undercounter units feature a Hot Water Assurance booster heater that guarantees NSF required 180 degree water temperature.  Add in Energy Star rated efficiency, with less than one gallon of water used per rack, and rugged stainless steel construction, and you’ve got a high performance unit that’s both efficient and effective.

Door Type and Conveyor Dishwashers – These high volume dishwashers can handle all the needs of a commercial kitchen or restaurant without sacrificing the efficiency of other Fagor models.  Stainless steel construction, dual powerful water pumps, and a heat booster guaranteed to achieve 180 degrees make these units a quality choice in commercial dishwashing.

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Star Manufacturing: Whatever You Need In Countertop Cooking Equipment

Star Manufacturing has been in the commercial cooking equipment business for a long time.  And their equipment has proven itself in the tough working conditions of commercial kitchens time and time again.  Star is probably best known for its countertop cooking equipment, and accessories like griddles, charbroilers, hot plates and hot dog cooking equipment…

Star Manufacturing: Whatever You Need In Countertop Cooking Equipment

Star hot dog cookers are some of the best in the business

Star Manufacturing: Whatever You Need In Countertop Cooking Equipment

Star charbroilers – radiant, lava rock, electric, and outdoor available

Star Manufacturing: Whatever You Need In Countertop Cooking Equipment

 

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Go Green, Save Money, Serve Better Produce

Go Green, Save Money, Serve Better ProduceAs the past few years have shown, produce can be a food safety liability for anyone in the food service industry. Easy spoilage also makes produce a very difficult item to manage on your inventory. On top of all that, produce takes a lot of time and labor to prep.

Yet fruits and vegetables are also a vital ingredient on any restaurant’s menu, and most of you out there have mastered the fine art of serving clean, healthy, fresh produce to your customers on a daily basis. Mastery of that art comes at a price, however. Chemical sanitization, cleaning, and spoilage all cost money and cut into your food margin.

Locally and organically produced produce don’t help your cause any either. Typically local and organic produce spoils faster even though it arrives fresher. And nobody wants their organic produce sanitized with chemicals after arriving through your back door.

There must be some kind of product that addresses all the issues you have dealing with fresh produce in your restaurant.

Well, I’m glad you asked.

The Saf-T-Wash by San Jamar addresses all three of your main food service sanitation concerns when it comes to produce: sanitation, freshness, and spoilage. How does it work? The Saf-T-Wash adds ozone to water and attaches directly to the faucet in your kitchen, allowing you to wash fresh produce and sanitize it at the same time while extending shelf life.

Ozone is a natural element that’s been used for years in the bottled water industry to kill pathogens during the bottling process. Ozone kills at least 99.99% of the major pathogens found in produce within two minutes of exposure, which is significantly more effective than a chlorine treatment. And ozone removes enzymes from fruits and vegetables that cause spoilage, improving shelf life after prep has been completed.

You also don’t have to use as much ozone treated water to clean produce during prep, saving you money on water. In general, treating your fruits and vegetables with ozone treated water is a more effective and efficient way to prep produce for serving. According to San Jamar, the money saved in water and labor savings plus reduced spoilage means the Saf-T-Wash pays for itself in 3 months.

Using the Saf-T-Wash also gives you a unique opportunity to market your restaurant as a green operation to your customers. Despite the economic downturn, studies still return consistent results when it comes to customer attitudes regarding green practices in food safety: consumers want more of it and they like restaurants that participate in green programs. If you’re serving organically grown produce washed with ozone treated water, you’re creating a great opportunity to add value to your restaurant brand in the eyes of your customer. And in an age of price wars and increasingly brutal competition, anything that sets you apart and adds value is something that might give you an extra edge over your competition.

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How A Low Flow Valve Can Improve Your Cash Flow (AND Green Cred)

How A Low Flow Valve Can Improve Your Cash Flow (AND Green Cred)

T&S Brass Water Saver Pre-Rinse Spray Valve

Your restaurant uses a lot of water.  Between the water you serve your guests, the ice machine, the dish machine, and the sink, any restaurant goes through a lot of water on a daily basis.  I don’t have to tell you how much that water costs you.  I’m sure you’re reminded every time you look at your monthly utilities bill.

When you go through as much water as a restaurant does in one month, even a small adjustment in daily water usage can make a huge difference in how much money you spend.  And sometimes those small adjustments can be astoundingly easy.

Take, for example, the spray valve on your pre-rinse assembly.  Naturally, you want a strong flow of water so that dishes can be quickly rinsed before they go into the dish machine.  The problem with a strong flow is that a lot of water gets used very quickly, and that costs you money.

In recent years low flow spray valves have become very popular for this very reason.  A low flow valve uses a fraction of the water per minute as older spray valves.  Over the course of a year, a low flow valve can save you thousands of gallons in water usage and therefore hundreds of dollars on utilities.
But will a low flow spray valve clean dishes?  The term “low flow” certainly doesn’t sound like something that powers food bits off very quickly.

How A Low Flow Valve Can Improve Your Cash Flow (AND Green Cred)
It took a company with a reputation like T&S to engineer a low flow valve that didn’t sacrifice any of the performance anyone would expect out of their pre-rinse.  Their new low flow spray valves clean dishes just as quickly or even faster than any other manufacturer.  Even better, T&S low flow spray valves use half the water as the competition, which can translate into as much as 100,000 gallons of water a year.

Making your restaurant more green is so overused these days it’s become cliché.  But when something as simple as changing out the spray valve on your pre-rinse can save you this much money, and bolster your greening efforts at the same time, what’s not to love?  It’s a win-win for your restaurant.

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Your Restaurant’s Guide To Commercial Composting

Every to go container, every disposable cup, and every plastic fork your restaurant uses ends up in a landfill somewhere.  Over the course of a year that adds up to millions of tons of trash from all the restaurants in the United States.  For most restaurants, these disposable items are a necessary part of doing business, and the lower the cost, the better.

Yet more and more restaurants are turning to compostable versions of these disposable items, even though they tend to be more expensive than their styrofoam and plastic counterparts.

Why?  Two main factors are driving the trend towards commercial composting:

Connecting with your customer.
Overwhelming majorities of Americans support sustainable products like compostable cups, plates, and food containers.  They may not be particularly motivated to spend more money for them at the grocery store, but when consumers encounter these products in places like restaurants, they tend to give the establishment high marks.  When you connect with customers on issues they care about, you’re going to see loyalty and repeat business increase.

Adding another facet to your overall green program. Whether driven by pure moral conviction or a desire to connect with customers (or both), more and more restaurants are instituting green programs as a part of their business.  The use of commercial composting and recycling systems have become widespread, and many restaurants employ programs to improve energy efficiency, reduce water use and carbon footprints.  Using compostable products can add a powerful element to any restaurant’s green efforts.

Your Restaurant’s Guide To Commercial CompostingSo how do compostable food service supplies work and why are they so great? Some common questions and answers:

What does compostable mean? Compostable products break down into carbon dioxide, water, and biomass at the same rate as cellulose (paper) in an industrial composting facility.  It may take these products longer to breakdown in a non-composting environment like a landfill, but in general these products break down exponentially faster than regular plastics and even biodegradable products.  For a more complete explanation, check out this article: Understanding Green Restaurant Terms: Compostable, Biodegradable, and Recyclable.

What are the benefits of corn-based compostable products? Corn cups and other compostable products made from corn are beneficial because they use a crop that is already produced on a massive scale in the United States to replace petroleum (oil) based plastics that rely on a substance we must import.  Corn-based products are also carbon neutral because the plants they are made from absorb an equal amount of carbon dioxide as is produced to harvest the crop.

What is PLA? PLA stands for polyactic acid, which is a polymer that is used to make a replacement for oil-based plastics.  PLA is made from lactic acid, which is created when the dextrose (starch) found in biomass like corn is fermented.  Today almost all PLA is created from corn, but in the future PLA will be made from other crops, including sugar beets, sugarcane, and rice, depending on what’s available locally.

How are sugarcane food containers, plates, and bowls made? Sugarcane has a long, fibrous stalk that contains a sweet juice.  Sugar and many other things are made from the extracted juice, leaving the stalk behind.  This leftover is called Bagasse, and it has traditionally been burned or discarded.  Disposable sugarcane products are made using Bagasse, taking a previously unusable byproduct and turning it into a fully compostable plate, bowl, or food container for your restaurant.

What does post-consumer recycled material mean? Post-consumer means the materials are recycled after they are used by consumers and discarded.  Compostable hot cups are partially (about 25%) made from post-consumer recycled materials.  Not only is it sustainable to use recycled materials, buying products made from those recycled materials helps stimulate demand, meaning more will be recycled in the future.

What kinds of compostable products are available for use in my restaurant? Corn cold cups (PLA), post-consumer recycled fiber hot cups, sugarcane food containers, and high heat PLA cutlery are all examples of products you can put to use in your restaurant.  Make sure any compostable product you buy is BPI certified, as this is the gold standard for compostable products.  Checking for BPI certification helps you avoid “greenwashed” products that claim they are compostable but really aren’t.

Using commercially compostable products in your restaurant has a clear marketing benefit for your business because your customers will appreciate your decision to use them.  If your restaurant has already decided that going green is a part of your business model, then compostable products are a must to round out your program.  If you haven’t yet decided whether greening your restaurant makes sense, check out The Back Burner’s Going Green section for more information on everything food service is doing to meet the increasing demand for sustainability in food service.

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The EndoTherm Thermometer: Does It Really Help You Save Energy and Improve Food Safety?

The EndoTherm Thermometer: Does It Really Help You Save Energy and Improve Food Safety?To be honest, there has been a lot of skepticism among the people I have talked to in the restaurant supply business when they first encounter the EndoTherm Thermometer.  Maybe it’s the appearance: the oversized outer plastic shell, which houses a normal alcohol thermometer immersed in a special silicone gel, gives the impression of a child-safe toy, meant to be too big for choking.  Maybe it’s the purpose: the EndoTherm accurately reads food temperature rather than air temperature, which sounds a little hokey to the old hands in the industry.

So what is the EndoTherm all about, anyway?  Well, the official party line is that the gel around that regular alcohol thermometer mimics food product: when food freezes, the gel freezes, and the thermometer can therefore get an accurate reading of what’s going on inside your refrigerated product, as opposed to what the air around that product is doing.

Why is that good?  There are two official reasons:

1) Air temperature varies in refrigeration units, especially ones that are opened and closed on a regular basis, like display cases or prep tables.  A thermometer that only measure air temp is affected by how air is moving around the unit, and, especially if it’s at the back, away from the door, it could be reading colder than the food product sitting by the constantly opening door.  This could affect food safety, since it’s possible to have food sitting in the danger zone even though the air temp thermometer is saying everything is fine.

If you were to place a couple EndoTherm thermometers around your refrigeration unit, one right by the door and some others in the middle and at the back, you would know just how well food in different spots were holding temperature.

2) You might also have the opposite problem: you are running the unit too cold.  Again, airflow varies in any refrigeration unit and that can affect the air temp thermometer.  Warmer air coming in from the opened and closed door might be bumping your thermometer up a degree or two, causing you to turn the thermostat down to keep everything below 40 degrees.  And it’s possible that your food product is sitting at a very comfortable 35 degrees or so, unaffected by those little blasts of warm air.

Again, the placement of a few EndoTherms around the refrigeration unit might reveal that you can turn the thermostat up and still maintain food safety.  And every degree you turn up translates into an 8% savings on the energy usage for that unit.  Any restaurateur who has seen the electricity bill knows just how much money that means.

So maybe the EndoTherm isn’t so hokey after all.  This thermometer was dreamed up by two fairly famous inventors in England and apparently it has been all the rage over there, and is just now catching on in North America.  The reputation of the creators lends some credibility to the claim “accurately mimics food temperature.”

I think the jury is still out.  Skepticism dies hard.  I would love to hear from some people who have used the EndoTherm and have found it to be everything they ever dreamed of, and people who thought it really would be better as a kid’s toy.  If you have some real world experience with this thermometer, leave a comment below and tell us about it!

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