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Troubleshoot and Repair Pre-Rinse Leaks [Video]

Don’t put up with time and efficiency lost due to a leaky pre-rinse! Most common leaks are easy to fix, and often don’t require you to replace more than one valve or washer. Learn more in this video how-to!

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Transcript

Hi, I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply. In today’s episode I’m going to show you common leaks to  your pre-rinse assembly and how to troubleshoot and maintain them.

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The most common areas for leaks on your pre-rinse would typically in a few common spots, either your hose itself, one of the two washers on either side of your handle, or somewhere around the face-plate itself. Here’s how we fix those.

The first leak you might see is actually coming from  your stainless steel hose. If it’s leaking through this, just replace the hose itself. Your next spot might be somewhere around the handle whether it be at the bottom of the handle or the top of the handle. Keep in mind in both of these spots of the handle, there’s a washer. So if it’s leaking in one of these spots, you’re most likely going to replace that washer. So careful when unscrewing this pre-rinse because the washer just sits there, and there’s that washer, so if it’s leaking on that side, that’s the washer that’s going to need to be replaced.

Same thing applies to the bottom of the handle. If it was leaking there, go ahead and unscrew the bottom of the pre-rinse, right in there, that washer will need to be replaced.

Next common place gets a little bit tricky because this next leak, these next two leaks both involve the face-plate itself. If you look at this seam right here from the top, if it’s leaking through this top seam, we’re going to want to replace this bumper itself. Unscrew this face-plate, be sure not to lose the screw, so this entire rubber bumper will need to be replaced if it’s leaking from the top of that. Just put it on, get your Phillips head screw, pretty easy right there.

If you’ve identified that your leak is not coming from the top of the bumper and is actually coming through the water jets itself, you’re most likely going to need to replace this bonnet in here. Here’s how you do so.  You’re going to remove the handle with a Phillips screwdriver, there are two Phillips screws so you’re going to need one to anchor the other on the other side. Once you remove that handle, go ahead and begin to unscrew this piece. If you notice, this valve is very similar to the valves that we had in our previous plumbing video of identifying faucet leaks. Keep in mind that your odds are that if it’s leaking out of the face of the spray nozzle itself, you’re most likely going to need to be replacing the seat washer right here, or the entire unit itself.

However, if it’s leaking from that valve stem assembly in the first place, it’s most likely this black washer. Again, inspect this whole unit and the integrity of the washers and valves in themselves and just replace the whole unit if need be.

I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply and that’s how you identify and troubleshoot common leaks to your pre-rinse assembly. Please comment below or if you have any other questions, contact our sales floor. Please subscribe to our weekly videos as well.

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Join Us in a Fix-It-Relationship with Over 7,500 Added Parts

Join Us in a Fix It Relationship with Over 7,500 Added Parts

We already offer more than 25,000 parts to help you make the needed repairs on many of your food service equipment and products, but with the addition of 7,500 more parts, we’re starting to feel that a unity is in order. No more do-it-yourself (DIY), it’s time for us to do-it-together (DIT).

Learn more by giving our team a call. We can help you save money by knowing what parts you need to have on hand for quick repairs and when you should and shouldn’t call the repair technician. Join with us in a fix-it-relationship and learn more about our expanded parts section.

It’s time for us to do–it–together.

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How to Replace the Thermal Sensor – Rinnai Commercial Gas Rice Cooker [Video]

If the rice in your Rinnai Commercial Gas Rice Cooker is coming out over cooked or under cooked, the most likely cause is a faulty thermal sensor.

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Video Transcript:

Hi. I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Resturant Supply. In this video we’re going to show you how to troubleshoot some common setbacks and easy maintenance repair for your Rinnai Commercial Gas Rice Cooker.

The last common setback that you’re going to experience with your Rinnai Commercial Gas Rice Cooker is actually how the rice itself is cooked. Whether it comes out overcooked or undercooked, it really comes down to your thermal sensor itself. Again, that’s this piece in the center with the spring. The reason why this is so important is because this is run by an induction magnet that actually cooks your rice from the bottom of this pan. Always be sure first and foremost that this surface is spic and span clean as well as the top of your thermal sensor itself.

From there, if you see any type of wear and tear from the daily grind and it is clean but you see the impression of the magnet inside, that means your thermal sensor needs replacing anyway.

First, you’re going to turn the whole machine upside down. The screw right here, the setscrew. Take that right out. First thing first, is you’re going to want to release the lowest washer on the plunger arm of the thermal sensor from the operating arm of the base. What I did is I pushed down on the spring of the plunger on the thermal sensor itself to get this pin out of that hole.

From there, this plunger should just be able to detach right from the operating arm and it will sink right in to the thermal sensor itself because it is a magnet. Nest, we need to remove this tricky littler securing spring of your thermal hot sensor. Pretty much you see the hoop in the back, you’re going to push away from the center and it should just pop right out of that hole.

From there, you’re going to give it a little 90 degree twist so that way the base of it can come out the bottom. Take note of the positioning of the feet on your thermal sensor and where there are in relation to the housing basis. For instance, this one foot on the thermal sensor has an angle cut into its base of its foot. Take note of that because when replacing this later you’re going to want to line that one special foot up in the same direction that you just took that securing pin from and just slides right out from there.

This is the thermal sensor and this is pretty much what drives the cooking of the rice. The cooking of the rice has nothing to do with the amount of weight or the amount of water you have. Strictly, it has to do with heat. Thermal means heat, this is essentially a heat sensor. That’s how it’s going to regulate the temperature of the cooking of your rice.

This is your thermal sensor spring. Keep in mind, this is actually tapered so it means one circumference is a little bit smaller than the other circumference. Meaning, it’s only going to fit on your thermal sensor one way. Keep in mind if you put this on and this ring can get above it, you got it on backwards. You have the big end at the top. What we do want is the small end at the top. Now it fits flush, you can’t quite get it over that top lid.

Take note of the shape of the base of this one foot compared to the other two. This angle to foot is going to be positioned in the back corner where we release that securing spring. Actually, replacing this securing spring is much easier than it looks, much easier than it was coming out. Big thing to take note of is this little L-shape in the end. It needs to go through this hole and down and into this slit that is positioned next to that angled foot base that we’re speaking of earlier.

Then once that’s in place there we’re going to focus on pushing that little hoop all the way to that back little slot that we took it out of earlier. Once you get that spring hooked back up to the base in both spots, you get the plunger from the sensor again. Remember, we have this one slight pin that needs to go in that hole. However, do not just want to put it in there like this. That is not secure.

What you’re going to want to do is push that first washer down with that pin down on the spring and get that to sit right in here. Now, do you see how the arm as well as the plunger are securely together in between those washers? Now, it’s just a matter of rotating that pin right into the hole. It’s just a matter of ease to get this piece back screwed into place. There you have your thermal sensor replaced.

I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply and that’s how you diagnose and perform some common repairs to your Rinnai Gas Commercial Rice Cooker. Here’s to a better mise en place!

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How to Replace the Pilot Orifice and Thermocouple – Rinnai Commercial Gas Rice Cooker [Video]

If you rely on a large capacity rice cooker, such as this model from Rinnai, you know that any time it spends broken, or not operating optimally, creates more problems and a loss of time. However, if the problem is with the pilot light – either not lighting at all, or going out on its own – there could be an easy way to quickly repair it and get your rice cooker back up and running.

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Video Transcript:

Hi. I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply.

In this video we’re going to show you how to trouble shoot some comment set backs and easy maintenance repair for your Rinnai Commercial Gas Rice Cooker.

Some tools that you may need are a phillips head screwdriver, an adjustable crescent wrench, needle nose pliers and optional, some pipe cleaner to clean out your tubing. Often can be found in arts and crafts supply stores.

The first common set back to troubleshoot for your Rinnai Commercial Gas Rice Cooker is there’s no flame or the pilot light won’t light itself.

First thing to check is your quick disconnect gasoline all the way up to your Rinnai Gas Cooker.

Remember that this valve needs to be parallel or in line for it being turned on. Perpendicular is turned off. The first thing to check.

From there, if it’s still not lighting and your gas is being hooked up to the machine itself, you’re most likely looking at a clogged pilot orifice that we need to replace. We’ll do that next.

The first thing you need to do is click your ignition button a couple of times. You shouldn’t have to do this more than 3 times and you should see a small flame behind your pilot housing right underneath here.

If your rice cooker is getting gas but your pilot light won’t stay lit, your problem is most likely build up in the pilot orifice which supplies gas to the pilot itself.

If your pilot lights, hold your ignition switch down for about 30 seconds and once you release it, if the pilot goes out, most likely your problem is the thermocouple.

The thermocouple is the safety device that ensures the pilot light is lit before the machine actually supplies causing gas to the burners.

If your thermocouple is bad, it will prevent the pilot and the burners from staying lit.

Once you identify good and correct has line connection, the next thing to do is actually tackle and repair and maintain your pilot orifice.

Before you perform any kind of maintenance or repairs to your equipment, be sure that it is always off and disconnected from any gas line.

Then from here, we see there’s 1 little screw holing on the drip pan. We’re going to go ahead and unscrew that and the drip pan slides right off.

The pilot orifice is located right behind this brass knot which is attached to this aluminum gas tube which is very fragile.

First, we’re going to take this clip on the thermocouple and undo this, set that aside. Just bend your thermocouples out of the way.

From here we’re going to see a screw and the pilot assembly that we need to undo. You can go ahead and set that aside.

From there, you can just bend this slightly out of the way.

When removing this brass knot to get access o your pilot orifice, keep in mind and remember that this aluminum has tubing is very fragile and we’re going to want to twist off the pilot assembly while holding that brass knot still.

This little brass tip right here is your pilot orifice. Often times in this little tube, in the pilot assembly can get clogged and that’s where we need our pipe cleaner.

Just take your pipe cleaner, stick it right down the tube and just kind of scrub it out.

This is a .25 pilot orifice. That number refers to the size of this little pin prick whole on the back and this is not interchangeable with any other orifice. Be sure you have the .25 orifice for your pilot assembly.

All right. Once we get our .25 pilot orifice into our pilot assembly, just a matter of screwing this back on in place to this aluminum coil. Again this aluminum coil is fragile so we don’t want to actually twist the knot, just want to get the pilot assembly finger tight, then make sure it’s nice and snuggles with our wrench holding on to that knot.

From there we can go ahead and place this back down on our housing for our pilot assembly. An easy way to get this screw back in, you just go ahead and put the screw on the housing itself and aim with that. And that’s how you replace your pilot orifice.

And then be sure that we put our thermocouple back into its place and the clip. Be sure when you’re using your clip, the hoop is for your finger to hold, to push it back in place.

The single sided end is for you to actually brace the thermocouple in.

If you recognize that you pilot light is igniting but it won’t stay lit, what you’re looking at is your thermocouple itself, needs replacing.

Again remember, this little clip here was for the thermocouple, take that out. We got a little screw down here that attaches to the thermocouple to the gas valve and then from there, your going to have to try and get the plastic clip with some needle nose pliers. This is probably the most tricky part just because the tight area to get to.

Take a look at the clip on this thermocouple. It just slides right into place and it clicks and once it clicks its locked itself into place.

To get it out, you’re always getting the needle nose pliers right on these ends and just squeezing it and pulling it right out.

Your new thermocouple probably come pretty straight. However, you’ll have to bend the coils as need be.

First thing first is you probably want to get that plastic clip to secure in first, then from there we can bend everything else around as need be and as necessary to get thermocouple back into place.

Again, getting that little screw on the thermocouple. It might be kind of hard to aim. You can go ahead and put it in the cable first then just point it right down into the hole.

And last but not least, our thermocouple clip. Again, the single sided non-looped end goes in the back, the hoop goes over the couple and this clamps right back into place.

And that’s how you replace your thermocouple.

I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply and that’s how you diagnose and perform some common repairs to your Rinnai Commercial Gas Rice Cooker. Cheers to a better mise en place!

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How to Replace a Vitamix Blade Assembly [Video]

Whether a Vitamix blender is crucial to your business, or if you simply like the ease and efficiency of mixing they provide, you know that keeping sharp blades is key to good operation. If your blades begin to dull, you can simply replace the blade assembly itself, without having to go out and but an entire new container (unless the container is worn out as well!). For this process, you will need a Vitamix Retainer Wrench.

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Video Transcript:

Hi, I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply. In today’s episode I’m going to show you how to change the blade assembly in your Vitamix prep container.

Pretty much what we have here is our retainer nut wrench by Vitamix; unique for its blade assembly replacements. As well as, we have a 64 ounce Vita prep container here. First you’re going to take off the lid as that’s not needed. Turn your container upside down. The nice thing is this wrench, that hole is going to fit right over your drive socket. It only fits one way and from there lefty loosey.

You want to be careful with those blades because they might be sharp still. I’m using a rag to grab a hold of that blade. That nut comes off and your blade assembly should just pop right out. Go ahead and take that old one. We can discard that. Now you have your empty container and your nut.

Now we’re going to get our new blade assembly. You’ll notice on the blade assembly there are two flat sides. That’s going to correspond with the two flat sides on the bottom of your container. Again, be careful just using a rag here. You could also use a cut glove, the Chain Mail Steel Mesh. Pretty much that way you don’t create any nicks on your fingers as you’re trying to replace this. In there it should just snap in place. Get our retaining nut. You can go ahead and screw that on finger tight for the time being.

Then get our retainer nut wrench by Vitamix again. We’ll tighten this piece back into place. There you have it, replacing the blade assembly on your Vitamix container.

I’m Chris Tavano from Tundra Restaurant Supply. That’s how you change your Vitamix blade assembly. Join us again next time.

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Reverse the Swing of Your Equipment Door [Video]

Having the door to a piece of kitchen equipment swinging open the wrong direction can be very inconvenient, and can make the item difficult to clean or even to use. Luckily, most manufacturers make the door swing on their equipment reversible. Follow these easy steps to reverse yours and make your kitchen more accessible!

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Transcript

Hi.  I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply.  In today’s episode, I’m going to show you how to reverse the swing on your door hinge for your equipment.

Do you ever experience that the layout of your kitchen hinders the accessibility of your equipment?  For instance, if your fryer was up against a wall, it might be kind of difficult to open this door all the way.  Keep in mind, most equipment doors are made to reverse the swing on it’s hinge.

Here, I’ll show you on this Fry Master fryer.  May not be the most esthetically pleasing thing as this logo is going to be upside down, but hey, it’s going to be functional and a little bit more operable for you in your layout.

First, we’re going to take off the handle to the door.  Pretty easy … two phillips head screws.  Next we’re actually going to take the door off of the hinge itself.  If you look down at the bottom, you’ll see a spring loaded set pin.  From there, we just push it in, lift it up, and we can get it to slide out.

Next, you’re going to want to unscrew the two screws on the bottom of this hinge plate.  Lefty loosy.  Be sure you attached our hinge plate.

Next we’ve just got to remove the door magnet itself.  It’s on a plastic clip.  Push on the bottom upward.  You should be able to slide it and push it out.

The mounting can be a little bit difficult because of this push clip.  Once you get those pushed in it should be able to slide out quite easily.  Now that we’ve got our hinge plate and our door magnet switched on to the new correct side, it’s a matter of putting our door back into it’s place with it’s spring loaded set pins.  So you don’t crush your fingers, it might be kind of easy to slide this top set pin in with a flat head screw driver.

There you go.  Reverse the swing.  Like I said, not the most esthetically pleasing with our name plate at the bottom and upside down, but functional none the less.

Last but not least, reattaching our handle back to the opposing side that we took it off from.  There you have it.  That’s how you reverse the swing on your hinge.

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Make Your Refrigerator Work Better and Last Longer [Video]

Performing regular preventative maintenance on your refrigerator can increase the efficiency of the unit, as well as save you expensive repairs down the line. Chris Tavano walks you through three easy parts to check to make sure that your refrigerator is in good working order.

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Transcript

Hi, I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply. In today’s episode, I’m going to help you troubleshoot a couple of common issues with refrigeration units.

Two common issues we see with refrigeration units is they’re not getting up to temperature correctly, or down to temperature, cooling in an effective manner. Or the compressor’s just constantly running and burning out. So one issue could very well be that you have an ice buildup on your coils.

As well, you notice that these grates are very thin aluminum vents. A lot of times, what can happen is since these are so fragile and aluminum, they can just fold in right on their selves, and what can very well happen is this can easily get kicked, a pan can fall into this, and at the same time, since they are so fragile and easy to bend, that they’ll just bend closed shut on themselves, and there you will not get any airflow, restricting your compressor to put your coolant at the right temperature range for your refrigeration unit.

So those are two big things that you can do preventively here in the compressor area, so that way your machine lasts a little bit longer. And last but not least, always check your door gaskets. A lot of times, these can start to deteriorate, break down, come off from the glue on the actual aluminum itself. A lot of times, this is where you’re going to get air flow leakage, and your compressor’s going to be constantly running to keep the machine at its refrigerant temperature.

At the same time, the compressor’s going to be working overload, because there’s a constant leak, and the compressor’s going to be running much longer than what it needs to be. So always be sure your gaskets are in good shape, and you replace them accordingly. If you need some tips on how to replace them, go ahead and check out our other video about replacing refrigerant gaskets.

I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply. That’s how you perform some very easy preventative maintenance on your refrigeration units. Until next time!

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How to Replace or Install Casters [Video]

Adding casters to any piece of restaurant or kitchen equipment makes cleaning and reorganization much easier, and can be done with a minimum of effort. In this video, Chris Tavano walks you through the installation process, as well as how to ensure that the casters that you order will be compatible with your chosen appliance.

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Video Transcript:

Hi. Welcome to Tundra Restaurant Supply. In this episode, we’re going to show you how to add or replace casters to your equipment.

So casters come in all different sizes and varieties. Unfortunately they’re not necessarily all compatible with all brands, so what you’re going to want to do is try and identify what kind of model number you have of your equipment, or you can measure the whole centers on your existing casters. Today’s demonstration we’re using our Frymaster Fryer. You can locate the model number on the inside panel of the door or you can check our other video, “Hot to locate model numbers on your equipment.” If it’s in a tricky spot you can always get an extendable flashlight to get to those hard to reach areas.

Currently we’re measuring the centered holes of our existing legs or casters. In this case, I’ve started the center of this screw on 1 just because it’s a little bit difficult to get to the edge of the tip of the measuring tape. You can also notice that it gets all the way over to 2-3/4. Minus the 1, the distance of these 2 centers is 1-3/4 inches. You’ll want to do the same thing for the opposing direction as well. Here we can notice it’s 3 inches. You can either search by your model number on the piece of equipment, or you can certainly put in the dimensions of your hole centers.

Also be sure that when you’re searching for replacement casters that you look for a caster that has a wheel diameter large enough to be able to put your equipment’s bottom edge approximately 6 inches off the ground. Also be sure that before you do any kind of repairs or move any of your equipment that everything is turned off, disconnected, drained, and cool before you start doing any work on it. Also keep in mind as your replacing your casters, you might want to have some wedges to be able to balance your equipment upright while you replace your casters or legs. Or have an equipment dolly or a second hand to be able to stabilize the piece of equipment while you’re working on the casters.

That’s how you identify and install replacement casters for your equipment. Surely at times it might be easier to lay your equipment on its side to do its replacement maintenance. However, be sure that if you’re working on a piece of equipment with a compressor, that you wait a full 24 hours once you place it back upright before you plug it in to allow the fluids to get back into the compressor.

I’m Chris for Tundra Restaurant Supply. Join us again next time.

 

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How to Replace the Blades in a Nemco Easy Chopper [Video]

When using a Nemco Easy Chopper, sharp blades mean the difference between getting clean, quick cuts and smashing your food to pulp. The most cost-saving option here is to replace the individual blades in the cutting assembly once they begin to dull.

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Video Transcript:

I’m Chris Tavano for Tundra Restaurant Supply. In today’s episode I’m going to show you how to change the blades and blade assembly to your Nemco Easy Chopper II.

The first thing you’re going to want to do is remove your pusher block and your base assembly base. Two little bushings just slide right off the greased poles and your blade assembly should slide right off as is. First and foremost this is your blade assembly faced up. Be very careful as these blades facing up are very, very sharp. I’m going to want to turn it upside down exposing the bolts. Get your crescent wrench and we’re going to loosen these all the way off. Once you’ve unscrewed your bolts the base plate should come right off. Set that aside and now you’ve exposed the bottom side of your blades.

This is going to be how we’re going to replace these. These metal bars, those are going to stay. Do not throw those away.  An easy way to get rid of your blades, flip it upside down, give it a little tap. Your entire blade assembly comes out. The first thing you’re going to want to note when you open your package of new blades is that there are two different kinds. Some are going to be loaded first and some are going to be loaded second. The best way to tell is identify where the slit is on the blade.

If you notice both these blades are facing the sharp edge towards you and this front row has slits towards the back base of that blade. Whereas the second one has the slits going through the cutting edge of that blade. We’re going to want to put in these ones first where you see the slit coming from the back. From here you’re going to want to organize your spacer guides. If you notice these little bars that we kept from the original, there’s little slits.

You’re going to want to see the slit that goes all the way through the wall of that guide to be facing the inside of the assembly. Place all four of those around the perimeter of the assembly itself and from there we can get our first set of blades where there is no slit on the cutting edge itself. Being very careful with these blades, you’re going to put blade down in the first slit horizontally in your spacer guide and the next one. Being sure to be very careful putting the cutting edge of each blade down into the spacer guide slits.

So after you’ve got your first set down we’ll work on the second set of blades where the slit goes through the actual beveled cutting edge itself. And these blades we’re going to place perpendicular going through each and every slit on the previous blades that we set in, as well as the spacer guide itself. Be sure that you’re pushing down with enough pressure on these blades to where all the tops are even and flush. Don’t have to worry too much on this side because remember you’re putting the cutting edge of the blade down into your table. These edges are not sharp.

As we put our base plate back onto our blade assembly, be sure to line up the post holes accordingly on your base. Screw your nuts back in, righty-tighty. Now remember when you flip this over you’re going to have brand new sharp blades so do not touch that surface up there. Once you’re replaced the blades on your blade assembly, it’s just a matter of getting this block back on the base of your chopper stand. Keep in mind that these top blades are very sharp to the touch and these elongated holes are for your post slots.

You’re going to grab your bushings next; slide those on. If this is getting a little stuck just add a little bit more food grade lubricant or grease to these posts. Then you’ve got your pusher block back on. That’s how you replace the blades in a blade assembly for your Nemco Easy Chopper II. Here’s to a better mise en place!

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To DIY or Not to DIY: Should You Make That Repair?

To DIY or Not to DIY: Should You Make That Repair?

When Tundra started, more than 20 years ago, we were a simple plumbing parts distributor.  Working out of a garage, our founder, Michael Lewis, began going door to door to see how he could help different businesses in the food service industry get the parts they needed to stay up and running, which quickly expanded Tundra to house more parts to serve its customers needs.

What he learned was that a lot of people in charge of running a kitchen were intimidated to make repairs, even simple ones.  Being the honest man he was (and still is), he took this as an opportunity to help teach people how they could make the repairs on their own.  The idea was that there were parts that you should have no problem installing yourself, while there were others that should be left to a professional.  Michael called them always DIY parts, sometimes DIY parts, and never DIY parts.

Always DIY Parts

Always Do It Yourself Parts require very little research and no technical skill to install. In general, if a part can be installed without the use of tools, it’s an Always DIY Part. Some typical examples include knobs, fryer baskets, light bulbs and hood filters.

If you’re trying to cut operating expenses in your kitchen, these are great items to start with. Because Always DIY Parts don’t require a service tech for installation, you start saving immediately on service labor, and you avoid the usual tech markup. Additionally, these parts can typically be used on multiple pieces of equipment and are generally in-stock ready for same-day pick-up or delivery. Usually, it would not make sense for a kitchen to stock replacement parts, but Always DIY Parts are one of the exceptions. Since most of these parts are multi-use (items like knobs), it may make sense to keep a few extras on hand.

To DIY or Not to DIY: Should You Make That Repair?

Sometimes DIY Parts

Sometimes Do It Yourself Parts require a small amount of research and little to no skill to install. These parts typically require the use of basic tools for installation, such as a screwdriver or wrench. The skill level for Sometimes DIY Parts is rather broad and spans from screwing in a refrigeration latch to installing a thermostat. While a thermostat is more difficult to install than a latch, the process can easily be taught. Everyone’s range for Sometimes DIY Parts is really determined by their confidence and comfort with making repairs.

Examples of typical Sometimes DIY Parts include refrigeration gaskets, switches, light fixtures, and high limits. While a lot of these items are typically multi-use parts, they are not necessarily needed as frequently so may not always be in stock. It is important when purchasing this category of parts to have a conversation with one of our sales team members to gauge the required technical knowledge for your specific part need.

With these parts, a little confidence and experience can go a long way to save time and money. This being said, most individuals can install Sometimes DIY Parts. If the installation is more difficult, you can always call a service tech to assist and still purchase the part yourself to save you the tech’s part mark-up.

To DIY or Not to DIY: Should You Make That Repair?

Never DIY Parts

Never Do It Yourself Parts require the highest level of research and advanced technical knowledge to ensure the installation is done properly. Some common Never DIY Parts are refrigeration compressors, steamer boilers/generators, and parts for any 480 volt equipment. Odds are, you’ll want to contact an experienced service tech for these repairs.

Never DIY Parts are typically not in stock, because the parts are linked heavily to specific OEMs, making it unlikely multiple people will need the same part on a frequent basis. While it is best to use a service tech for these types of repairs, you can still look to purchase the necessary parts. To speed up the ordering process, present our sales team with the make and model number of your piece of equipment, as well as the item you need.

To DIY or Not to DIY: Should You Make That Repair?

Have DIY Questions?

We know that this only slightly covers how to gauge if you should be doing repairs yourself, but as it was Michael’s intention, we do hope that this helps you walk away with a slightly better understanding of what you should have in stock in your own kitchen.  And of course, if you have any questions on how to DIY on any of your food service equipment, let us know, we are lucky enough to have a lot of team members with years of experience in equipment repair.

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