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10 Energy Efficiency Tips for Your Restaurant

10 Energy Efficiency Tips for Your RestaurantIt’s such a buzzword these days it has almost become cliche, but nevertheless green restaurants are an important and lasting trend.  Customers are the main force driving this, and consistently they say they value restaurants with green practices.  Giving customers what they want while reducing your operating costs through more efficient (“green”) practices seems like a win-win for almost any restaurant.

These posts focus on how to improve your restaurant’s energy efficiency:

1. Manage Equipment Effectively - The cooking equipment in your kitchen are some of the biggest energy consumers  for your business.  If you can cut energy use here, you will see a considerable improvement to your bottom line.

2. Energy Efficiency: Look Past The Kitchen – Now that you’ve used post #1 above to improve the energy efficiency of your kitchen, you can start working on the rest of your building.  Again, some very simple steps can result in significant savings.

3. Manage Hot Water Efficiently – Another energy hog is your hot water heater.  Your restaurant goes through a lot of hot water, and anything you can do to improve the efficiency of heating water will also help you save money.

4. Use Efficiency Rebates! - Sooner or later you’ll need to update restaurant equipment, and the sooner you do so, the faster you’ll improve your kitchen’s energy efficiency.  Depending on where you live, you can take advantage of some significant rebates from local goverment and utilities to help offset the cost of new equipment.

5. Understanding Product Packaging Terms: Compostable, Biodegradable, Recyclable - Just because packaging sounds green doesn’t mean it is.  The companies that market and package products your restaurant uses are trying to sound green just like everyone else, and it’s improtant to understand the nuances of the language they use on the products you buy.

6. Green Technology: Energy Management Sytems – Chain restaurants are starting to use energy management systems to control energy use in multiple locations.  It’s only a matter of time before this technology can be applied in indepenedent restaurants as well.

7. Why Recycle? Because It Feels Good – Recycling is one of the few tips on this list that won’t result in you saving money.  But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t do it.  Customers who see a robust recycling program in a restaurant feel good about your establishment, and that can mean a lot more than the cost of recycling.

8. Green Consumers Going Strong - Despite recession and financial pressure, studies show that consumers till want green products and services, even if they have to pay more for them.10 Energy Efficiency Tips for Your Restaurant

9. Buy An Energy Efficient Steamer – Investing in a commercial steamer is a great way to improve the efficiency of your kitchen and the taste and quality of your product.  Learn more in this post.

10. Tech Talk: Replacing Refrigeration Door Gaskets - Get some practical, do-it-yourself advice on one of the easiest ways to increase energy efficiency in your restaurant: by replacing worn door gaskets.

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Greener and Cheaper: Restaurants Grow Their Own Food

Greener and Cheaper: Restaurants Grow Their Own FoodYou’ve heard about organic ingredients.  You’ve also heard about food miles and skyrocketing food costs.  Anybody in the restaurant business can tell you these issues have affected their customer’s tastes and their bottom line.  Stir in increasingly frugal customers and you’ve got a recipe for trouble in any restaurant.  That devilish combination of customers expecting better quality and also expecting to spend less is enough to make any restaurateur tear their hair out.

More and more chefs are turning to a simple solution that addresses both the quality and the cost on this two-headed monster.  Chefs are growing their own ingredients.  Of course, this is hardly a new concept, but as the demand for organic rises along with the prices on top quality greens and vegetables, the number of chefs turning to gardening during the day what they plan to cook that night has risen sharply.

Abandoned lots, small terraces, and modest urban gardens from San Francisco to Cincinnati are being converted into tiny organic farms by chefs passionate about finding the best ingredients possible without having to pay through the nose.  Many have discovered that being able to control the process, from seed to harvest to the walk-in, affords them a pride and a certainty in the quality of their ingredients.

Restaurants that source their food so locally (often in their own backyard) is also a great green practice, saving the thousands of miles ingredients typically travel through the traditional food supply network.  Those saved miles not only means less transportation emissions, it means less cost to the restaurant.  And any time a restaurant can bring better ingredients to their customers at a better price, they should take it.

Are you thinking about starting a garden for your restaurant?  The first three steps you should take:

Location.  Climate, water, and soil will all affect what you can grow well and what you can’t.  Research which plants and vegetables do well in the local climate and what their water and soil requirements are.

Organic.  If you’re going to garden your own herbs and vegetables, they might as well be organic.  Research organic practices and implement them in your garden from the beginning.Greener and Cheaper: Restaurants Grow Their Own Food

Time and alternative local sources.  Organic gardening takes time and effort.  Doing it successfully requires a passion and an investment of time that not every restaurant has.  If you are looking to source local ingredients, but don’t have the space, time, or climate to do so successfully, contact local farmers and build relationships that will still save you money on food costs and allow you to make your restaurant more sustainable.  You might also settle on a combination of both methods, growing herbs like basil or cilantro that are easy to tend while sourcing locally other ingredients that require more effort and space.

No matter which way you decide to go, local food sources are becoming a popular trend in the food service industry, and not only because it sounds good to customers.  There are some real economic incentives as well, and any restaurant looking to cut costs would do well to look into the local food network for some solutions.

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Restaurants and Farmers Work Together To Reduce Waste and Improve Crop Yields

Restaurants and Farmers Work Together To Reduce Waste and Improve Crop Yields

San Francisco’s food scrap collection program benefits farmers and restaurateurs

San Francisco restaurants are participating in a city-wide compost collection program that has collected over 105,000 tons of food scraps and yard trimmings in a single year.  All that waste used to end up in the landfill, where compostable waste makes up a full third of everything in the dump.  The all natural fertilizer created from composting all those restaurant food scraps has become so popular with nearby farmers and vintners that the program regularly sells out in the spring, when demand is highest for fertilizer.

Because the compost is so rich in organic matter, many food growers have seen significant increases in crop production and yield, which more than justifies the increased cost of using the San Francisco compost.  Even better, all natural compost is much more carbon neutral than petroleum based fertilizers, with the added benefit of relieving pressure on local landfills.

Restaurants and Farmers Work Together To Reduce Waste and Improve Crop Yields

Food scraps collected from San Francisco restaurants are improving crop yields on surrounding farms

The organic crops produced as a result of the compost program are then sold back to many of the restaurants that contribute in the first place, completing a cycle of sustainability that has become a model for other cities across the country looking to institute their own programs.

The biggest hurdle for most cities is food scrap collection and education.  Separating food waste properly requires attention to detail and some training to avoid mixing contaminants into the food scraps to be composted.  San Francisco’s program has been particularly successful because the majority of people participating are educated about what can and cannot be composted.

Check with your local government to see if a composting program exists near you.  Reducing food waste can help you save on trash hauling fees, but more importantly, it helps your restaurant’s green credibility, and that makes for loyal and happy customers.

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Hot Chef Trends for 2009

Despite the economic downturn you’re sick of hearing about (unless you’ve been under a rock), two trends remain hot for the food service industry in 2009: food nutrition and sustainability.

Even as consumers tighten belts and close wallets, they’re looking for healthy foods brought to them in an environmentally sustainable way, and if they think they can afford it, they’ll go for the product with the “green” label every time.

An older trend that’s still going strong is healthy and nutritious foods.

Most customers have started to blend green or organic food with healthy food, which makes it easy for you to blend the two into your menu for 2009.

Here are some tips to help you keep up with the times:

Customers want healthy choices, not demands. In other words, they appreciate healthy options on a menu but don’t want to be forced to eat them.  Menu diversity is nothing new, but it would surprise you how many restaurants have made the mistake of getting a little overzealous with healthy menu options.

Sometimes customers just want a burger and fries.

Advertise your sustainability. In recent years, your business has more than likely adopted cost cutting measures like recycling, energy conservation, and buying local products.

Let your customer know!

These are things they can connect with that make them feel good about consuming your product and bringing them back for more.

Back your claims up with green certification. Claiming to be green is one thing.  Getting certified is an entirely different matter.

The Green Restaurant Association has been promoting sustainable restaurant practices since 1990.

Getting your restaurant certified green will not only help you cut costs, it will give you and your product legitimacy in the eyes of the customer, enhancing their loyalty and increasing person-to-person buzz about your business.

Oh, and you’re helping the environment!

A healthy kids menu equals happy customers. Gone are the days of giving little Jimmy a burger and fries off the kid’s menu while Mom and Dad enjoy their entrees.

Today’s parents want nutritious offerings for their kids that will be eaten with all the enthusiasm of a Happy Meal.

Coming up with creative menu items for kids that are both healthy and satisfying can be a challenge, but the chef who pulls it off can count on happy customers coming back with the entire family.

Buy local (thinking global optional). As energy costs rose in the past few years, buying produce, ingredients, and meats locally became a red hot trend in the food service industry.

Not only does buying locally cut costs, it affords chefs and restaurant managers more purchasing flexibility.

Add in customer appreciation because your business is saving energy and investing locally, and you’ve got a winning combination.

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