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Why Buying Hobart Mixer Attachments Shouldn’t Cost You An Arm and a Leg

Why Buying Hobart Mixer Attachments Shouldn’t Cost You An Arm and a LegAnyone with a Hobart mixer in their restaurant or commercial kitchen will tell you what a great machine it is.  These mixers last a long time despite constant, heavy use, and for many kitchens they are essential to the success of daily operations.  Often the attachments that make your Hobart mixer so indispensable wear out or break long before the machine itself does.

That’s good in the sense that Hobart’s tank-like mixers are a seriously long-term investment that pays off big time in reliability and durability.  But it’s also bad in the sense that Hobart likes to charge an arm and a leg for their mixer attachments.  Dough hooks, mixer bowls, flat beaters, pastry knives, graters/shredders, you name it, if Hobart makes it, they’re going to make you pay for it.

That leaves you with two choices:

1)  Hobble around a limbless freak but have nice, shiny new Hobart brand name attachments on your mixer
2) Forego prosthetics and buy generic attachments

I’m sure you know where Hobart comes down on this issue.  Their attachments are high quality, and cheap knock-offs are likely to break, underperform, and cause you all kinds of problems that will make you wish you had never valued your limbs so much.

It’s true, there are some cheap mixer attachments out there.  But what’s also true is that you can buy high quality, durable mixer attachments that fit any Hobart mixer but do not carry the Hobart name.  These mixer attachments are equal in quality to anything Hobart makes, and they’re also a fraction of the cost.  So no matter what kind of mixer attachment you need, get quality replacements that have everything a Hobart brand name attachment has, except the Hobart name stamped on it.

If you are in the market, here’s some key things to keep in mind before you buy:

Determine if your Hobart mixer is a Standard or a Legacy HL model.  Standard Hobart mixers are older models.  The attachments for Standard models slide onto the mixer shaft and twist into place.  Legacy HL mixers are newer models.  The attachments for Legacy HL models slide onto the mixer shaft and lock into place with a pin.  Make sure you buy the right kind of attachment according to the type of Hobart mixer you have!Why Buying Hobart Mixer Attachments Shouldn’t Cost You An Arm and a Leg

Look for shredder/grater attachments with German steel blades.  German steel is hardened, which means the blade lasts longer and cuts sharper than your average steel blade.  Any extra cost is more than made up by how well this blade will cut over the long term.

Keeping your Hobart mixer going with new attachments shouldn’t feel like buying a whole new mixer.  Buying smart by finding high quality generic replacements will save you a lot of dough, and won’t force you to sacrifice any quality (or body parts).

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Restaurant Equipment: 4 Factors For Calculating Total Cost Of Ownership (cont)

There’s always a significant amount of cost involved whenever you buy a new piece of restaurant equipment.  Those costs only continue as that equipment ages in your restaurant – from energy use to repairs, the consequences of new equipment will be around for a long time after you’ve written the check to purchase.

Of course, restaurant equipment makes you money as well.  Without that fryer or reach-in refrigerator or griddle, you wouldn’t be able to prepare your product for your customers.  But understanding the total cost of a piece of equipment over its lifespan has been ignored all too often in the food service industry for years.

Many chains have started doing Total Cost Of Ownership analyses for equipment because they buy large numbers of the same type of equipment all at once.  A faulty or inefficient piece of equipment can mean thousands of dollars in extra expenses for the chain over the lifespan of the piece, and conducting a cost analysis beforehand helps avoid problems down the road.

By and large, most independent operators do not undertake the complicated task of calculating total cost – usually because the information or the know-how necessary to make an accurate calculation isn’t available.

That doesn’t mean independents and smaller chains can’t benefit from a cost analysis before they buy new restaurant equipment.  In a continuation of yesterday’s post, here are two more factors to consider when calculating the total cost of a piece of equipment over its lifespan:

Restaurant Equipment: 4 Factors For Calculating Total Cost Of Ownership (cont)Service and Parts Availability.
Every food service operator loathes equipment downtime.  If your equipment isn’t working, you’re losing money.  Therefore it’s usually a good idea to do some research on the availability of equipment services and parts in your area before you buy.  It’s also good to get an idea of how easy it is to make do-it-yourself repairs on a unit that will save yourself an expensive service call.

There are many quality manufacturers in the food service sector who design units that are easy to pull apart and fix common component failures.  If you’re shopping around, make sure you ask about common parts and how they can be fixed on each unit so you can get a better idea of how quickly (and affordably!) you can fix those problems down the road.

Finally, consider the availability of generic parts for new restaurant equipment pieces.  Generic parts can save you a considerable sum of money if they are available for the unit you own, and are equal to or better in quality than Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) parts.

Ease Of Use. Energy efficiency is important, but so is labor efficiency.  A piece of equipment that’s difficult or dangerous to operate means more training time and a higher incidence of work-related injuries.  In a high turnover industry like food service, equipment that requires a lot of training to operate simply doesn’t make any sense.

In addition, difficult to operate equipment slows down production and reduces worker efficiency, which can bring some pretty high costs in a high-pressure environment like a restaurant kitchen.  When people order food, they want it quickly and usually at the same time as a lot of other customers.  Easy to use equipment that promotes employee efficiency rather than hindering it is an important cost to factor into your buying decisions.

Considering these factors before you buy a new piece of equipment will help you make an informed decision that goes beyond simply finding the lowest price.  In many cases, the initial price tag has little to do with how much that piece of equipment will actually cost you over its entire lifespan.  A total cost analysis helps you make a more informed decision.

If you’re interested in a more in-depth analysis of total cost, try this standard practice resource from ASTM International.

Read the first installment of this article.

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Why Buying Scales Will Save You Money

Why Buying Scales Will Save You MoneyI’m not telling you anything new when I tell you that inventory control is very important in any restaurant.  But I think it’s surprising just how few restaurants view the use of scales as a way to manage shrink and really control how food product is used.  In fact, scales should be the central tool in any restaurant manager’s quest to make sure everything that comes in the restaurant goes out as a finished product a customer is paying for.

The best place to start is with a receiving scale.  As product rolls in the back door off the truck, weigh each bulk item and record the weight.  That way you know exactly how much of each kind of ingredient you have available.  This helps you in two ways:

  1. You’ll know exactly when it’s time to order more product
  2. If you’re out of product, but you only sold X number of entrees that use that product (i.e. not enough of them to be out), inventory shrink is happening, and it’s time to hunt down the culprit

Portion scales are a necessary compliment to your receiving scale.  After all, if you’re measuring what’s coming in but not what’s going out, you’ll have a hard time managing your inventory.  There are two kinds of portion scales: mechanical scales and digital scales.

Mechanical portion scales indicate weights on a large, easy-to-read dial.  These scales are ideal for measuring bulky items that you’re cooking in large quantities, like french fries or chicken wings.  You sacrifice a little bit of accuracy for speed and convenience, which makes sense if you’re just pounding out apps on Super Bowl Sunday.

Why Buying Scales Will Save You Money

Digital portion scales are much more accurate and allow you to measure ingredients with precision.  Use these scales for measuring out the ingredients to your restaurant’s world famous secret sauce, anything that needs to be baked, and other multi-ingredient recipes.  The nice thing about digital scales is that you can reset the tare and calculate ingredient proportions very easily.

For those of you who don’t know, the tare on a scale is a feature that tells the scale to ignore the current weight on the scale and measure additional weight from zero.  In other words, the mixing bowl you put on the scale will weigh zero once you press the tare button and the scale will only register the weight of the ingredients you add to it.

You can measure ingredient proportions on a digital scale easily and much more accurately than with measuring cups because different ingredients compact differently in a measuring cup.  Flour is the best example.  A cup of flour can weigh between 4 and 6 ounces, depending on how compacted it is in the cup.  If you extrapolate that out to 4 cups of flour, you’ve got up to a 50% difference in the weight of the flour.

You can also calculate proportions more easily with a portion scale because you know how much ingredients that are hard to measure with a cup weigh, like eggs.  A recipe for pasta might call for three parts flour to two parts egg.  If two eggs weigh four ounces, then you know you need six ounces of flour.

Finally, scales can help you manage another extremely important inventory item in your restaurant: alcohol.  Use a liquor scale to measure the remaining amount of alcohol in each bottle at the end of the day and record the amount.  I’ve seen managers go through this exercise countless times, but never with a scale.  Usually they just look at the bottle and estimate how much is left.

You depend on alcohol sales to contribute to your bottom line entirely too much for such an inaccurate evaluation of inventory.  A liquor scale takes the guesswork out of the equation and allows you to compare hard numbers with your sales so that you can spot shrink and put a stop to it quickly.

Scales mean accuracy.  Accuracy means less waste.  Less waste means less cost.  Less cost equals more profit.  The equation is as simple as that.

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How A Low Flow Valve Can Improve Your Cash Flow (AND Green Cred)

How A Low Flow Valve Can Improve Your Cash Flow (AND Green Cred)

T&S Brass Water Saver Pre-Rinse Spray Valve

Your restaurant uses a lot of water.  Between the water you serve your guests, the ice machine, the dish machine, and the sink, any restaurant goes through a lot of water on a daily basis.  I don’t have to tell you how much that water costs you.  I’m sure you’re reminded every time you look at your monthly utilities bill.

When you go through as much water as a restaurant does in one month, even a small adjustment in daily water usage can make a huge difference in how much money you spend.  And sometimes those small adjustments can be astoundingly easy.

Take, for example, the spray valve on your pre-rinse assembly.  Naturally, you want a strong flow of water so that dishes can be quickly rinsed before they go into the dish machine.  The problem with a strong flow is that a lot of water gets used very quickly, and that costs you money.

In recent years low flow spray valves have become very popular for this very reason.  A low flow valve uses a fraction of the water per minute as older spray valves.  Over the course of a year, a low flow valve can save you thousands of gallons in water usage and therefore hundreds of dollars on utilities.
But will a low flow spray valve clean dishes?  The term “low flow” certainly doesn’t sound like something that powers food bits off very quickly.

How A Low Flow Valve Can Improve Your Cash Flow (AND Green Cred)
It took a company with a reputation like T&S to engineer a low flow valve that didn’t sacrifice any of the performance anyone would expect out of their pre-rinse.  Their new low flow spray valves clean dishes just as quickly or even faster than any other manufacturer.  Even better, T&S low flow spray valves use half the water as the competition, which can translate into as much as 100,000 gallons of water a year.

Making your restaurant more green is so overused these days it’s become cliché.  But when something as simple as changing out the spray valve on your pre-rinse can save you this much money, and bolster your greening efforts at the same time, what’s not to love?  It’s a win-win for your restaurant.

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Commercial Fryers: A Buying & Maintenance Guide

Commercial Fryers: A Buying & Maintenance GuideA commercial fryer cooks certain foods extremely efficiently and quickly, and are often used in restaurants and commercial kitchens for appetizers and specific entrees.  Fryers use a heating element to superheat an oil medium to around 400 degrees Fahrenheit.  When food product is dipped into the oil, the moisture inside boils, but because oil and water don’t mix, the product doesn’t lose moisture, and it’s steamed from the inside out.

The two most common types of commercial fryers are countertop and floor models.  The main difference between the two is capacity, and when buying a new fryer, this should be the first factor you consider.  Capacity is determined by how many pounds of french fries a fryer can cook in one hour.  Typically this is calculated by roughly doubling the oil tank capacity of a fryer. Therefore a 40 gallon fryer should produce between 75 and 80 pounds of french fries per hour.

It’s important to calculate the cooking capacity you’ll need for your commercial kitchen before purchasing a new fryer.  Countertop models have much less capacity than floor models and are typically used for very small volume applications.  Larger volume kitchens purchase multiple tank floor fryer units or put several smaller floor units in series next to each other.  This is especially useful for frying different food types simultaneously.  Avoid flavor transfer from one type of food to another by using the same heating oil.

Gas vs. Electric Fryers

Gas fryers use a natural gas flame either inside a series of tubes that run through the oil or through heating elements located towards the bottom of the oil tank.  Gas fryers heat up more quickly than an electric fryer.  Gas fryers are also more efficient, though rising natural gas prices has narrowed that gap in recent years.

Electric fryers use an electrical heating element that drops directly into the oil to heat.  The primary difference between a gas and an electric fryer is capacity.  Electric fryers are small capacity countertop and drop-in models that operate very well when dealing with a small amount of oil (up to about 25 gallons).  In this situation, electric fryers are more efficient and recover more quickly.

However, larger capacity fryers, with 40 gallons of heating oil or more, are almost exclusively gas heated units.  In a larger capacity context, gas heat is the only way to go in terms of efficiency and heat recovery time.

Types of Fryers

There are three common fryer designs: tube style, open pot, and flat bottom.  Almost all fryers are constructed out of heavy gauge stainless steel and include an accurate thermostat for temperature control.

1. Tube style fryers have a series of tubes that run through the bottom of the heating tank.  Gas burners run through these tubes and heat the oil.  Tube style fryers also have a cooler sediment area below the tubes.  This allows crumbs and food particles to settle out of the super heated oil above the tube burners into the cooler oil below the burners, preventing the carbonization of those particles, which can leave a burned taste on fried foods.

2. Open pot fryers are heated with either a gas burner or an electric heating element that wraps around the base on the outside of the oil tank.  The oil is heated as these elements heat the metal base.  Open pot fryers also have a sediment zone below the point where the gas or electric element is heating the oil to allow food particles to escape the super hot oil.

Open pot fryers are typically easier to clean than tube style fryers because the bottom sediment zone is open and reachable.  The heating tubes on tube style fryers make cleaning the bottom of the tank more difficult because they sit in the tank above the sediment zone, blocking easy access.

Both open pot and tube style fryers can handle most food products in significant quantities, depending upon the tank capacity of the fryer as discussed above.

3. Flat bottom fryers do not have a sediment zone that allows food particles to settle out of hot oil.  This type of fryer is therefore best for lighter foods that can be bulk fried like tortilla chips and taco shells.

Commercial Fryers: A Buying & Maintenance Guide

Fryer Maintenance

The heating oil you use in your fryer degrades in quality over time and should be replaced.  The frequency with which you need to replace heating oil depends upon what you cook, how much of it you cook and how regularly.

To improve oil quality and lifespan, use a heating oil filtration system to filter out food bits and debris from the fryer.  A fryer filter works by draining heating oil from the fryer tank, circulating it through a filter that strains out unwanted particles, and returning the cleaned oil to the fryer tank.

It is also important to boil out fryers regularly to burn fat and carbon buildup off the heating elements and the tank.  These deposits can become corrosive and cause severe damage to the fryer.  Be sure to clean the inside of the fryer regularly as well, the most logical opportunity for this being when you replace the heating oil.

Make sure you have the proper equipment to handle spent heating oil.  Used oil should be stored in stainless steel drums and transported in a spill-proof container with wheels for easy movement.  A local biodiesel company will dispose of your used oil for free or even pay you for used heating oil.

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Which Energy Efficiency Upgrades Are The Best Investment?

Let’s face it—restaurants are energy hogs.

According to the National Restaurant Association, restaurants use five times more energy per square foot than other types of commercial buildings. And of the energy that restaurants use, the kitchen uses five times more than the rest of the building. Energy costs, on average, represent approximately 30% of a building’s annual budget.

Energy efficiency is essential to a restaurant’s bottom line. Given our industry’s razor-thin profit margins—between 4% and 6%, typically—every dollar saved in energy costs is like an extra $20 in sales. Canada’s Office of Energy Efficiency (OEE) estimates that investing in efficiency measures can save you 20% on your energy costs.

The decision to invest in energy efficiency is a relatively easy one, but deciding what to spend money on is a very different proposition. Every facility is different and a variety of  factors—including the age of your building, the kind of food you serve, and the types of appliances you have—affect what will make a dent in your energy costs. What works for you might not be suitable for someone else.

Fortunately, there are some straightforward ways to figure out how best to invest your energy budget.

  1. Determine where your energy is going. In an average full-service restaurant, food prep makes up 35% of the building’s energy consumption, with heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) consuming 28%. An energy audit—done by a professional, or simply by evaluating your utility bills—will help you figure out where you’re spending the most money, and where you might be able to improve
  2. Compare your facility with similar buildings. Talk to your neighbours and other restaurateurs to establish benchmarks for your performance. Are they doing better than you? Worse? What are their bills like?
  3. Calculate the payback period of any potential investment. This is how long it will take for an upgrade to pay for itself through savings. For a preliminary introduction, take a look at BizEnergy’s post on simple payback.
  4. Select which energy efficiency measures you’re going to take. These might include purchasing new, high efficiency ENERGY STAR appliances, implementing an energy management system, or simply replacing your lightbulbs—you’ll be able to determine what will work best for your space. Make sure you take a look at rebates and financial incentives that may be available from the government and from your local utilities.

While you may not have the funds to invest in a complete high-efficiency kitchen retrofit, there are inexpensive steps you can take that will have an immediate impact on your bills. Upgrading your lighting, for example, is a simple and relatively inexpensive change that will help reduce your energy costs quickly. Picking the low-hanging fruit is a good way to free up savings that can then be used for more extensive measures in the future.

Another strategy to reduce your energy efficiency investment is to roll your energy upgrades into your equipment replacement plan. When a piece of restaurant equipment needs to be replaced, purchase a model that’s as efficient as possible.

Keep in mind that it’s usually not enough simply to install energy efficient appliances and sit back to watch the savings roll in. Work with your staff to implement operating procedures that emphasize conservation, like formal start-up and shut-down schedules. That way, you’ll support your investment in technology with a change in human behaviour.

For more information, check out BizEnergy’s post on simple, DIY ways to cut your energy costs.

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It’s Commercial Ice Machine Season! Are You Ready?

Its Commercial Ice Machine Season!  Are You Ready?Commercial ice machines form a critical link in the chain of operation in a restaurant or commercial kitchen.  Ice machines can also be one of the largest expenditures in your budget, so choosing a unit that works for your particular needs and situation is vitally important.

And now that the warm summer months are here, the time of year you are most likely to buy a new ice machine are upon us.  This guide is intended to help you choose the ice machine that’s right for you.

Size According to Needs

commercial ice machine is the most important decision you’ll have to make.  In addition to space constrictions in your restaurant or commercial kitchen, you need to buy the right capacity ice maker and ice bin to make sure you can keep up with peak demand without over producing ice.

To calculate your business’ ice usage, refer to the following chart:

Food Service

  • Restaurant: 1.8 lbs. per person
  • Cocktail: 3 lbs. per person
  • Salad Bar: 40 lbs. per cubic foot
  • Fast Food: 8 oz. per 16 oz. drink

Lodging

  • Guest Use: 5 lbs. per room
  • Restaurant: 1.8 lbs. per person
  • Cocktail: 3 lbs. per person
  • Catering: 1 lb. per person

 

Healthcare

  • Patients: 10 lbs. per bed
  • Cafeteria: 1 lb. per person

The average number of people you serve a day plus your kitchen’s daily usage will give you an idea of how much ice you need in a 24 hour period.  Making sure your business always has ice at its disposal requires a careful consideration of storage space and production capacity.

Its Commercial Ice Machine Season!  Are You Ready?An ice bin that’s too large will result in a lot of melted ice, costing you money.  But too small of an ice bin means you’ll run out at peak operating hours, costing you customers.  The key is to strike a fine balance between ice production and storage.

The most important thing to remember is that it’s cheaper to store ice than to make it.  In other words, a larger ice bin that leaves you with some leftover ice after peak demand is more efficient than an ice machine that must produce 24/7 to keep up.

Also take into account the future growth of your business when deciding which commercial ice machine to buy.  A good ice machine, if properly maintained, should last at least 10 years, and in that time hopefully your business will grow as well.  It’s usually a good idea to add 10% – 20% to your peak capacity needs to accommodate future growth.  Some ice machines also come with stackable bins that allow you to add storage space as your demand for ice grows, adding more flexibility.

What Kind of Ice?

Different ice machines make different kinds of ice, and the type of ice you select is best suited for different applications in your commercial kitchen or restaurant.

Cubed Ice:Its Commercial Ice Machine Season!  Are You Ready?

  • Comes in Whole Dice or Half Dice sizes
  • Is dense, meaning it melts slowly and cools drinks quickly
  • Recommended for: cocktails and beverages, ice dispensers, and retail sales

Flaked Ice:Its Commercial Ice Machine Season!  Are You Ready?

  • Requires less energy to produce
  • Is easier to mold and shape for salad bar, meat, or seafood displays
  • Reduces choking hazards, making it ideal for healthcare and childcare applications
  • Recommended for: hospital and daycare cafeterias, salad bars, poultry, fish, or produce displays, and blended drinks

Nugget Ice:Its Commercial Ice Machine Season!  Are You Ready?

  • Is softer than cubed ice but more dense than flaked ice
  • Is chewable and a customer favorite for beverages
  • Can also be used in product displays or salad bars

Air Cooled vs. Water Cooled

Commercial ice machines employ two methods for chilling water into ice: water cooled and air cooled.  Both types of machines have their pros and cons.

Air Cooled Ice Machines:

  • Are affordable and easier to install
  • Are usually less costly to operate
  • Raise the temperature in a room and have to work harder in hot environments
  • Are noisy
  • Required in areas with water conservation codes

Water Cooled Ice Machines:

  • Are more expensive and harder to install
  • Can operate efficiently in hot environments
  • Are quiet
  • Depending on where you live, may violate local water conservation codes and be prohibitively expensive to operate due to water use

Remote Condenser Units

Larger air cooled ice machines that produce more than 500 pounds of ice per day can also be equipped with an optional remote condenser unit.  A remote condenser is placed away from the ice bin or dispenser, usually on a roof.

Remote condensers:

  • Are air cooled
  • Are more efficient and quieter than indoor air cooled units
  • Require a more expensive professional installation

Maintenance

Most commercial ice machines are equipped with anti-microbial linings in areas where ice is produced and stored.  These linings inhibit the growth of bacteria, mold, and algae.  However, it is still very important to follow a regular cleaning schedule for your ice machine.  Thoroughly clean the ice bin and production parts at least once a month with specialized ice machine cleaner.

Also clean the condenser fan (on air cooled units) regularly and the air filter if the unit has one.  On both water and air cooled units, purge the water lines regularly to prevent mineral or bacterial buildup.

Should You Use a Water Filter?Its Commercial Ice Machine Season!  Are You Ready?

Installing a water filter with your commercial ice machine has become a standard practice in recent decades.  Most manufacturers actively encourage adding water filtration to your commercial ice machine and will extend the warranty by as much as two years if you install the correct water filter with your new unit.

Filtered Water:

  • Improves ice machine performance and lifespan
  • Tastes better to your customer
  • Reduces mineral deposits inside your ice machine, decreasing the chances of a breakdown

Buying the right sized ice machine is the most critical element in making the right decision.  Take the time to carefully calculate the ice requirements, both presently and in the future, of your business.  After you buy your ice machine, a few easy maintenance practices plus a water filter will ensure the unit performs for years to come.

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Buy An Energy Efficient Steamer

Buy An Energy Efficient Steamer

Steamers are energy efficient and cook food quickly without nutrient loss

Commercial steamers use either circulated or pressurized hot steam to quickly cook food items.  Steamers are ideal for cooking rice, vegetables, fish, and shellfish.

Because food is cooked by circulating hot steam over it, most nutrients are retained, making steam cooked food appear more appetizing and taste better.

Food is also cooked much more quickly using a steamer.

There are different types of steamers using different methods to cook food.  Selecting the steamer that works for you depends on the specific situation in your commercial kitchen or restaurant.

Steamers also come in various sizes, and you need to take into account the volume you plan to handle with your steamer before purchasing one.

Types of Steamers

  • Pressureless – these steamers use a convection fan to circulate steam through the unit and cook food.  The circulating air cooks more evenly than a pressure steamer, though cooking times are longer.  A pressureless steamer door can also be opened during cooking to check or season food.
  • Pressure – pressure steamers cook food by letting steam pressure build in the unit as opposed to circulating it.  This cooks food faster but the door or lid of the unit cannot be opened while cooking because of the pressurized steam.

There are two types of pressure steamers: cabinet type and steam kettle models.

Cabinet type models look and operate mostly like a pressureless steamer except they use pressurized steam to cook food rather than a convection fan.

Countertop steam kettles operate like a residential pressure cooker.

Connection vs. Boilerless

Most countertop steamers are boilerless, meaning you add water to a built in reservoir in the bottom of the unit with its own heating element.

Connection steamers have a direct water line that comes in to the steamer from the building’s water source.  This steamer type can handle higher volumes but is harder to clean and maintain.

Both types should use only filtered water with a scale inhibitor to reduce cleaning and maintenance.  Using unfiltered water can also affect food taste.

Combi Ovens

Combi ovens can use steam, standard convection, or a combination of the two to cook food very quickly and efficiently.  Although combi ovens are very expensive, they can replace many other standard restaurant equipment pieces like fryers, holding and warming cabinets, and of course steamers and convection ovens.

Combi ovens also save space because they can replace other restaurant equipment.

Calculating Steamer Size

Steamers (excluding kettle steamers) come in 1, 2, 3, or 4 compartment sizes, with a one compartment unit capable of producing up to 200 meals per hour.  Combi ovens are most often used in high volume situations because they can cook food so quickly and offer multiple cooking options.

Maintenance and Operation Tips For Steamers

Some maintenance and operation tips for your commercial steamers:

  • Use filtered water with a scale inhibitor. A scale inhibitor removes minerals from tap water.  These minerals can build up in your steamer, requiring constant cleaning and performance problems.  Some models have an indicator light alerting you when they need to have buildup cleaned.  Unfiltered water can also affect the taste of food cooked in steamers.
  • Preheat steamers before cooking food. It usually takes at least 5 minutes for a steamer to heat up.
  • Season food after it has been cooked in a steamer for best taste results.
  • Use a perforated pan for vegetables and break up frozen vegetables so they cook evenly.

Steamers are a great addition to any commercial kitchen, and because they are much more energy efficient than other conventional cooking equipment like ranges, you can make up for the cost of purchasing a steamer through energy savings.

Factor in optimized food taste and quick cooking, and the reasons for buying a commercial steamer become very clear.

Check out more restaurant equipment.

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Electrolux-Dito: Mix, Cut, Slice, & Cook

If your restaurant is short on food prep equipment, Electrolux-Dito can definitely help.  From the popular Bermixer stick mixer series to vegetable cutters, slicers, and big floor mixers, there’s a Dito for whatever food prep task you have in your kitchen.

Electrolux Dito: Mix, Cut, Slice, & Cook

Use Dito Bermixers to power mix whatever you’re making: sauces, soups, etc.  For bigger jobs, Dito’s line of planetary mixers might be more your speed:

Electrolux Dito: Mix, Cut, Slice, & Cook

And when you need to prep vegetables fast, nothing beats Dito’s Mighty Green veggie cutter and other models:

Electrolux Dito: Mix, Cut, Slice, & Cook

When you’re ready to cook, Dito has some killer pannini grills that can really spice up your lunch menu:

Electrolux Dito: Mix, Cut, Slice, & Cook

And don’t forget about the Libero line of cutting edge, top quality cooking appliances, ideal for catering and concessions:

Electrolux Dito: Mix, Cut, Slice, & Cook

From induction woks to electric griddles to slicers, mixers, and cutters, depend on Dito for a job well done in your kitchen.

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The Quick Guide to Commercial Refrigeration Problems

Commercial refrigeration is key to the success of any restaurant and keeping your units properly running can save you both time and money. Whether your commercial refrigerator won’t stop running when you want it to or simply won’t run at all, this quick guide will help you to troubleshoot all of your refrigeration problems and find the right solution.

If your commercial refrigerator won’t run at all or won’t stop running, you’re probably looking at a defective thermostat.  You can test this easily. First, unplug the unit and open the evaporator housing. Locate the wires attached to the thermostat, remove and connect together with electrical tape. If the unit runs properly when turned back on, simply replace the thermostat.

Encountering difficulty with rising temperatures? The first step towards a solution is identifying what type of refrigeration thermostat your refrigeration unit uses.  If you’re dealing with either an air-sensing thermostat or evaporator-sensing thermostat, you can replace the part yourself. But be aware that the two are not interchangeable, so be sure to correctly identify which you’re working with first. If your commercial refrigerator uses a low pressure control, you’re going to have to call a service technician to get the part repaired.

The Quick Guide to Commercial Refrigeration Problems

Problems with a broken or malfunctioning fan motor need to be dealt with immediately, because without proper refrigeration your food is at risk of going bad quickly.  First off, you need to identify whether your unit uses a condenser fan motor or evaporator fan motor. A condenser fan motor will be found outside the refrigeration interior while an evaporator fan motor is found within the interior. Replace the motor fan by identifying the specific model of motor and blade (both are usually stamped into the back of the product and are easily accessible) and ordering a new one. Installation is usually brand-specific and can be found in your unit’s accompanying guidebook.

If the door to your commercial refrigeration unit is improperly closing, you could potentially be throwing away energy and money. The quick fix to this problem is simple: you need to update your gaskets. This do-it-yourself fix merely requires you to ascertain the dimension, brand and style of the existing gasket and order a new one. Replacing old gaskets is as easy as popping them off and snapping the new ones on.

The Quick Guide to Commercial Refrigeration ProblemsIf you need to replace faulty hinges or latches in your commercial refrigerator, start with simple identification. With both hinges and latches, you must determine whether you’re working with flush or offset parts, which is determined simply by running your hand over the part, looking to see if it is smooth, or flush, or not. If you’re working with offset hinges and the offset size is not available on the back of the part, you’ll need to measure the distance from the wall surface to the door surface to find the correct size. In terms of latches, there are two different types: magnetic  and those with a strike-and-latch lock. These latches will have an easy to identify number on them. With both latches and hinges, the easiest method is always to look for their ID number to order the right part the first time around.

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