eTundra Categories

Tag Archives | restaurant trends

Digital Media For Your Restaurant In The Digital Age

Digital Media For Your Restaurant In The Digital Age

As we get further into the Digital Age, restaurants can use digital media to their advantage.

TVs have slowly been creeping further and further into every restaurant’s atmosphere for years now.  It started with a small black and white television in one corner of the bar so guys could watch the game.  Now many bars have several HD flatscreens showing multiple games and news channels at once, and even dining areas have started to keep a TV or two positioned in strategic corners so customers can keep up on sports and information.

But as digital media permeates our lives more and more, a new era has dawned in how televisions can be used in the food service industry.  Those screens don’t have to be, and shouldn’t be, just used for sports and talking heads anymore.  That’s because the technology has advanced to the point where restaurateurs can engage customers in new ways, and because that technology is now widely available, customers themselves welcome and even expect to be engaged with digital media.

Consider some ways to leverage the digital phenomenon in your restaurant:

Advertise yourself and your specials.  Well placed digital media in your restaurant can become a great vehicle driving sales.  Not only can you promote daily specials and high margin menu items, you can drive brand awareness with digital media campaigns.  And because your medium is a flatscreen TV, it’s easy to change specials and rotate brand messaging often at almost no additional expense.  That means you can experiment with multiple advertisements and specials until you find the ones that work best.  You can also offer many more promotions without having to worry about changing menus, which give you the freedom to find new ways to attract customers.

Become interactive.  Because it’s so easy to load new content onto digital media, restaurants have a lot of leeway with trying new items and promotions. However, the only way to find out if these new promotions are working is through customer feedback.  Of course, analyzing sales is one way to discover which promotions are working and which ones are not.  But digital media can also be a great vehicle for getting customer feedback.  Interactive touch screen monitors can collect information from customers quickly and in a way that engages and entertains the customer.  Interactive digital media can even collect orders from customers and give them a direct line of communication to management.

Entertain while customers wait.  Digital media can also entertain customers while they wait for food or service, and studies have shown that customers who are entertained while they are waiting for service are much more forgiving about their wait times.  As we have already discussed, TVs have been used for decades to entertain customers in restaurants and bars.  Digital media takes this concept to a new level by allowing you to insert advertisements and branding messages about your specific location into more general entertainment.

This means you can not only advertise but intermingle that advertising with entertainment, which makes your advertising much more effective.

No doubt, investing in a digital media system for your restaurant can mean a hefty up front expense.  But if you leverage this technology properly, you can see very real boosts to sales, brand awareness, and customer satisfaction.  And boosting those three factors are vital to any business’ success.

Continue Reading

Can Google Improve Food Safety?

Can Google Improve Food Safety?A pilot project currently in development at Google will enable health officials to spot outbreaks of deadly food borne illnesses 7 to 10  days faster than the Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) current system.

Google accomplishes this by tracking queries entered into its search engine by people who are trying to find information on symptoms and sicknesses they’re experiencing.  Google has already launched Flu Trends, which tracks search queries like “flu symptoms” and identifies geographic areas where those queries are spiking.

The data Google collects matches the flu trends published by the CDC, suggesting Google’s information is accurate.  Now Google is planning to apply this system to E. coli and salmonella outbreaks so that the source of the contamination can be contained much more rapidly than it is today.

Seems like a great idea, right?  Not everyone is so excited.  Privacy advocates have already raised the alarm, warning that any database that collects and tracks the behavior of such a large number of free citizens will inevitably lead to abuse.

Google counters that this information is for the greater good and that individuals will remain anonymous.  Of course, anonymity has been promised before when it comes to large databases and it seems like there’s always a leak.  Just ask the thousands of Americans who have had their financial information compromised by leaks and hacks in the past two years.

For the food service industry, Google’s trend tracker could be a double-edged sword.  Of course, food safety is always a primary concern for restaurateurs.  But what if Google, in the admittedly honorable process of identifying a contamination source, starts naming restaurants frequented by people who are getting sick?  Those businesses would be dead and gone in a matter of minutes, regardless of the level of responsibility they deserved for the outbreak.

So where should such a powerful tool draw the line?  And where is Google planning on drawing that line?  The technology is still so new it’s impossible to tell yet, but as the data  we enter into the world’s most popular and powerful search engine gets used to track our behaviors, the conflict between privacy and information seems more and more inevitable.

Continue Reading

Boost Sales With A Free Meal

Boost Sales With A Free Meal

The Laguna Grille in Long Island, NY

An increasing number of restaurateurs are looking to boost sagging sales with value-minded deals to lure customers back into their restaurants.  A particularly successful strategy has been employed by the Laguna Grille in Long Island, NY: a “Bailout Program,” which randomly awards free meals to a table per shift.

The ensuing buzz packed his two locations on a recent weekend and generated some great PR in the local press.  Not only do customers feel that you are commiserating with them about the hard economic times, free meal promos also build brand recognition and loyalty, which in turn can boost word-of-mouth marketing.

Denny’s Restaurants has embraced this hot marketing technique fully.  On Super Bowl Sunday the chain announced it would offer a free Grand Slam breakfast to customers from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Tuesday, February 3.  Denny’s market share has been slipping in the face of intense competition from fast food chains like McDonald’s and Burger King and breakfast-only chains like IHOP.

The Denny’s gambit was a complete success.  2 million customers showed up for their free Grand Slam, and sales have ticked upward since the promotion.  It was so successful that Denny’s followed up recently with another promotion that gave away a Grand Slam for every one purchased.

There are many ways to creatively apply a free meal campaign to your own restaurant, whether you’re a small independent operator or a mid or large sized chain:

  • Encourage customers to sign up for your email list and randomly select a monthly winner from new signups to receive a free meal
  • Follow Laguna Grille’s example and randomly give away a free meal per shift
  • Give away a free entrée or appetizer in exchange for filling out an online or paper survey and providing an email address
  • Hold “happy hour” specials featuring a buy one, get one free entrée, appetizer, or drink
  • Have customers bring in a down economy related item like a pink slip, stimulus check, or foreclosure notice to receive a free meal

The best way to leverage a free meal offering is to gather some information from your customer while they take advantage of it.  The more you know about your customer, the better you can target them for repeat business in the future.  And the more you build your base, the more likely you are to survive hard times.

Continue Reading

Should You Cut Costs In Payroll?

Should You Cut Costs In Payroll?My recent post, “Missouri Legislature Debates Wage Cuts For Servers” sparked some debate about cutting payroll expenses in your restaurant.  Finding places to cut expenses as revenue falls is never an easy endeavor.  And since labor is almost definitely your number one expense, it’s easy to look there first when considering ways to save money.

There may definitely be some places where labor costs can be reduced, such as cutting back employee hours or eliminating underperforming staff.  All businesses look to their human resources department for cost cuts in tough times.  But be careful here, because cutting labor is a task best left to a scalpel rather than an axe.

That’s because the one thing you need now more than anything else is good customer service.  Actually, you need stellar customer service.  When consumers start cutting back, their expectations of service go up, and the only way to get them to spend at all is to take care of them in every way possible.

Your staff is the best tool you have to make sure every hungry customer that walks through your doors leaves satisfied and full.  If you start cutting back on staff to save money, you could start hurting your chances at increasing future revenue.  Overall morale goes down when people are let go because of hard times rather than performance.  And no matter what, customer service will suffer when you lose experienced staff.

Now is the time to focus on fulfilling the needs of your customers even better than before.  If some staff have been a drag on your operation, by all means cut them now.  But look for other ways to reduce costs before you start cutting quality staff.  Your best customers will appreciate the attention, and hopefully maintain their regular visits to your restaurant.  And new customers will be blown away by your commitment to quality service and hopefully come back, even if times are hard.

While Circuit City isn’t in the food service industry, a lesson can be drawn from their experience.  When sales started declining, Circuit City decided to cut staff as a way to reduce costs and boost profits.  It worked for a while.  But then customers stopped coming in altogether.  Circuit City’s rival Best Buy refused to cut back on customer service, and soon customers were flocking to their stores, not because Best Buy’s prices are better or because they have a better selection, but because Best Buy staff were always there to help.

Circuit City has since declared bankruptcy.  Best Buy may not be breaking any profit records, but they’re still in business, and their customers are happy.  Things could be a lot worse.

What do you think about this issue?  Leave a comment below!

Continue Reading

The Pizza Vending Machine

The Pizza Vending Machine

The Pizza Vending Machine

Italian Claudio Torghele has developed a pizza vending machine, complete with dough, sauce, and toppings, all in less than three minutes.  The machine, called “Let’s Pizza,” will knead the dough, spread the sauce, and give you a choice of toppings, including bacon, ham, cheese and tomato, and vegetable.  Customers can watch their pizza being prepared through a window, and the average cost is about 4 euros or 5 dollars.

Torghele hopes to make the pizza vending machine available throughout Europe and North America.  The machine has already done very well in test markets and its novelty always seems to draw crowds of onlookers, which bodes very well for sales, especially as people begin to look for more affordable options in a down economy.

Not everyone is so enthusiastic, however.  Traditional pizzeria owners in Italy have criticized the pizza machine as a cheap gimmick that sacrifices taste and quality.  Torghele responds that sometimes people are looking for value, convenience, and fast delivery over top quality.

The verdict on the pizza machine will be passed in the streets, and so far, it appears the average consumer loves being able to watch a great little pizza prepared fresh by a machine quickly and affordably.

Continue Reading

Gordon Ramsay: The Restaurant Black Widow

Celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay’sshow Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA has been a huge hit, garnering thousands of American viewers and elevating the chef’s celebrity even further.

Unfortunately, the restaurants he’s supposed to be helping are dropping like flies in the wake of his black widow touch.  The show’s premise is to bring Ramsay’s expertise and creativity into a struggling restaurant and turn the place around.

But it was revealed recently that over half the restaurants that have appeared on the show have since gone out of business.

Some owners and managers complain that Ramsay’s management style, which includes making everything fresh every day and using high-end product and ingredients, created a standard too expensive to maintain in a down economy coupled with rising food costs.

Other victims of the show are less diplomatic, calling Ramsay a jerk who thinks he can impose his lofty standards on any restaurant.  Some are even suspicious it doesn’t really matter to him whether a restaurant on the show makes it or not, as long as ratings remain high, which they have through multiple seasons in the U.S. and the U.K.

Perhaps the most important lesson to take away from the Ramsay “kiss of death” is that every restaurant is different, and managers and owners have to account for the many divergent factors that make up the success of any establishment.

Of course, the ideal situation is to be able to attain Ramsay-style high standards and still make a profit, but any restaurateur will tell you that the situation on the ground is hardly ever ideal.  Instead, being highly adaptive, creative, and flexible are the traits that will eventually spell success in the food service industry.

Continue Reading

Social Media Marketing’s Dark Side

Plenty of national food service companies have been eager to wade into the social media world as a way to engage and recruit customers.  Dunkin’ Donuts has tens of thousands of friends on Facebook.  Other restaurants, large and small, have pumped up their online presence in recent years and the internet has become a very important medium for advertising.

But social media also has a dark side, because once you throw your brand out into cyberspace, anyone can praise it.  Anyone can also tear you down.

Take the Jack-In-The-Box example.

The national chain ran a Super Bowl ad this year in which their long-time mascot, Jack, was hit by a bus.  Jack-In-The-Box followed the ad up with a social media marketing campaign that allowed users to post get well cards for Jack.  The chain leveraged several social outlets, including YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and Flickr.  Thousands of people responded, and a good portion were great for brand-building.

However, a significant percentage were vulgar, brand-bashing, and downright offensive.  In the “old days” (read: anything more than 3 years ago) relinquishing power over what could be said publicly about a brand was pure marketing sacrilege.

But progressive marketers these days have recognized a couple key sea changes, especially as the Millennium Generation gains buying power.

First, people 30 years old and younger in this country have been bombarded with advertising since birth.  They know when they are being pitched and they are likely to be skeptical.  Second, anything that lacks authenticity is Dead On Arrival, and a waste of marketing dollars.

Hence Jack-In-The Box’s willingness to let consumers drive their campaign, even if it meant allowing Jack to get beat up in the process.  In the end, the ultimate authenticity is a surrender of control over a brand.  The most authentic marketing is word-of-mouth, and in an era of unprecedented connectivity, word-of-mouth can travel at lightning speed.

Campaigns like the “Get Well Jack” one are ways to harness the powerful, if unpredictable, world of electronic communication.  Just be ready to experience the dark side of social media marketing, where brands are passed through the ringer by anonymous pranksters.  Luckily, most brands come out the other end bruised but truly “authentic.”

Continue Reading

The Golden Gate Restaurant Association Denied By Supreme Court

The Golden Gate Restaurant Association Denied By Supreme CourtThe Golden Gate Restaurant Association (GGRA) petitioned the Supreme Court recently to prevent the city of San Francisco from enacting legislation that would require employers to pay a fee to provide health coverage for their workers.

On Monday, the Supreme Court refused a temporary stay on the San Francisco legislation.  All businesses in the city with 20 or more employees would have to meet the new requirements.

The law in San Francisco was originally passed in 2006, but has since been held up by a successful court challenge by the GGRA.  A federal appeals court decided the law could be enacted temporarily last year, and now the GGRA is appealing to the U.S. Supreme Court for an emergency injunction to prevent the law from going into effect this year.

Similar legislation in New Jersey and Maryland were struck down by other Federal appeals courts, setting up a conflict in the lower courts that usually means the Supreme Court will weigh in.

However, it is also noted that the Court does not like to get involved in current national policy issues, and the Obama administration’s lofty health care goals for this year could prevent the Supreme Court from weighing in on the San Francisco petition.

The $1.17 to $1.76 per hour per employee healthcare fee has been decried by business owners in the Bay Area as putting an undue burden on business.  Business owners also claim the law violates a federal act that prevents local government from enacting separate pension and benefit plans from national ones.

San Francisco lawmakers counter that healthcare for the city is a necessary, progressive service that benefits everyone.  They also say the hourly fee can be applied in multiple ways, including towards a company’s health premiums, the city’s Healthy San Francisco program, or employee health accounts.

The question of how universal health coverage will affect business in the United States is only now heating up as progressive policies are being considered at all levels of government in the U.S.

Will universal health care wreck business and entrepreneurship?  Or will it create a progressive, egalitarian society for the 21st century?  Somewhere in between?  Weigh in with your opinion below!

Continue Reading

The Economics Of Free

The Economics Of Free

Should everything be free in the new economy???

Google has profoundly affected the way business is done the world over.  Besides becoming a frequently used verb (meaning “to search”) in multiple languages, the internet search and advertising giant became an international success on a business model that has never been attempted before.

Google offers its primary service, internet search, for free.  Ten years ago, when Google started, offering anything for free was unheard of, unless you were hocking towels on an infomercial.  Google’s success has shown that such a business model is not only viable, it’s the wave of the future.

While restaurateurs probably won’t start giving away their entire menu for free anytime soon, new economic realities have forced some innovative approaches to luring customers back to the food service industry, and free has played a huge role.

Denny’s kicked off the new approach to restaurant marketing with a Super Bowl ad announcing that Grand Slams would be free for one full day after the big game.  The success of that promotion has encouraged other chains to get in on the act, including Quizno’s, who recently wrapped up a million sub giveaway through a specially created site called millionsubs.com.

A café owner in Ohio even removed prices from his menu and allows customers to pay what they want for the coffee and breakfast items he serves.  Sales and customer visits have shot up as a result.  The practice of pay-what-you-want was invented in Europe, and has become even more popular since the economy started going south.

Of course, it may not work so well if a guest can rack up a few hundred dollars worth of entrees and bottles of wine.

And there are hundreds of more examples of restaurants finding the benefits of giving something away for free.  In a larger sense, however, the advent of giving away products and services for free has become rooted in consumer culture, and once consumers get something for free, they’ll want other things for free in the future.

But the economics of free also make sense, even if they seem a little counter-intuitive at first.

First of all, your customer appreciates the gift, and if they get one thing for free, they are more likely to buy other things from you, either in the future or at the same time they redeem their free item.

Secondly, nothing should ever be free.  If your customer doesn’t pay money for the thing they get for free from you, then they should either be counted on to buy something else either directly or indirectly from the free thing or you should get something from them, like an email address or a survey.

In an information age, collecting data about your customers has become vitally important to the success of any company.  Giving something away for free is one of the cheapest ways to get the information you’re looking for.

Finally, giving something away for free is a great way to create buzz around your brand.  The free publicity chains like Denny’s and Quizno’s have gotten out of their free food promos has more than made up for the cost of the giveaways.

The economics of free are the economics of the future, and the business you can generate from giving away something for free can far outweigh the cost.  And making more money than you spend isn’t anything new: it just makes good old-fashioned business sense.

The Economics Of Free

Giving things away for free can mean more sales and customer loyalty.

Continue Reading

Menu Trends: Potatoes Make A Comeback

Menu Trends: Potatoes Make A Comeback

The Good Ol’ Potato

Everyone remembers the bad rap potatoes got when the Atkins Diet was at its peak – too many carbs meant the potato should be avoided at all costs.  But times, and attitudes, have changed as more and more people realize diets are less about all protein and more about making healthy food choices.

Potatoes have zero sodium, saturated fat, and cholesterol, and at only 110 calories per serving are a very healthy option, as long as you have the discipline to stay away from too many toppings like sour cream and cheese.

8 out of 10 people eat potatoes of some kind almost four times every two weeks, and that number has definitely risen since the ebb of the Atkins craze.  More and more quick service and casual dining establishments are adding or revamping their potato offerings – and the result has been solid sales.

While traditional toppings are still the crowd favorite, especially in winter Menu Trends: Potatoes Make A Comebackmonths when comfort foods are the most popular, more and more restaurants are getting creative with their potato offerings with positive results.

Some examples include treating the potato as two halves of a sandwich – and filling the middle with tried and true crowd favorites like club sandwich ingredients.  Others allow you to build your own topping combination from the existing salad bar for some very tasty, personalized results.

Even some upscale places are getting in on the potato revival, with interesting and very delectable concoctions with shitake mushrooms, feta cheese, shallots, and skirt steak.

Going back to an old standby in tough times is comforting for your customer, and could also be comforting for your bottom line as restaurateurs all over look for creative ways to survive.  The traditional appeal of the potato doesn’t require any additional work on your part.

The best part is you don’t need special restaurant equipment to prepare great potato dishes.  Reminding the customer how healthy and tasty potatoes really are, and coming up with some great creative toppings to compliment old favorites is a great way to add value to your menu.

Continue Reading